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Why should I fuse and slump glass in separate firings?

Fusing and slumping are two unique processes requiring their own unique firing schedules to get right. It's not possible to conduct these processes simultaneously. A firing schedule designed with the objective of fusing and slumping at read more

What temperature should I use for tack-fusing?

A tack-fuse is a "lighter" fuse than a full fuse.  Tack-fusing is a kilnforming technique used when you want to join two or more separate pieces of glass together but also retain their individual characteristics. Tack-fusing temperatures read more

What temperature should I use for slumping?

Glass slumping is a fun and rewarding kilnforming technique used to make bowls platters plates and many other objects. Slumping projects will usually require relatively low temperatures and longer hold times in the kiln than many other read more

What temperature should I use for fusing?

Since temperatures and firing schedules can vary depending on the project you're making there's no single answer to this question. We do offer suggested firing schedules for specific projects on many of the articles and projects on our Methods read more

What schedule should I use for annealing?

Since temperatures and firing schedules can vary depending on the project you're making there's no perfect "one-size-fits-all" annealing schedule. You can learn basic principles for annealing in Technote 4 Heat & Glass. Also by scanning read more

What is tack-fusing?

Tack-fusing is kilnforming technique wherein two disparate pieces of glass are heated until they're just hot enough to stick together but not so hot that they lose their individual characteritics or fuse flat. Related Questions What read more

What is slumping?

Slumping is a kilnforming process that uses heat and gravity to transform sheet glass into the shape of a mold. One can to create an almost endless variety of forms when slumping glass. When the glass is heated in a kiln and enters a read more

What is fusing?

Fusing is the technique of joining two or more pieces of glass by heat in a kiln. There are different glass fusing techniques. For example “tack fusing” is a fusing technique in which the pieces of glass are heated until they are read more

What is firepolishing?

Firepolishing is the process of heating a glass object in a kiln to a temperature high enough to impart some level of gloss to the surface. Related Questions What temperature should I use for firepolishingHow can I cast to get some read more

What is devitrification or "devit"?

Devitrification ("devit") is the growth of crystalline structures within or on the surface of glass. ("Vitri" = glass; "devitrification" = the process of becoming un-glasslike). Devit can result from firing too slowly through the devitrification read more

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Quick Tip: Fritfetti

Say yes to sprinkles! Steps (4 firings) Make frit balls with Medium Frit. See Quick Tip' Frit Balls. Cut 7” (approx. 18cm) circles. You’ll need 3 circles of Clear and one of each opalescent style to make the…

Pre-Firing Your New Kiln

Overview Before using a new kiln for glass projects' you will need to pre-fire it. This burns out binders' moisture' and other residue left over from the manufacturing process. Read and download the PDF file' Pre-Firing…

Quick Tip: Little Wisp Bowls

Create your own streaky color palette. Layer Clear and White Streaky sheet glass over transparent tint glass styles. Slump in the Cone Bowl mold to upturn the edges and achieve luscious color at the rim. We’re making bowls…

Glossary

Anneal' To cool previously heated glass through a specific temperature range in order to relieve excessive stress once the glass reaches room temperature. Annealer' More accurately called an annealing kiln or annealing oven. A…

Quick Tip: Opaline Overlays

Style codes for glasses above' White (000113-0030)' Driftwood Gray (000132-0030)' Elephant Gray (000206-0030)' Deco Gray (000136-0030)' Slate Gray (000236-0030)' Black (000100-0030)   Opaline sheet glass. Amazing…

Using Fusible Decal Paper to Transfer Laser Printed Images

Overview With this paper you can make a decal out of any image that you can print on a laser printer' including letters' numbers' line art' graphics' or even photographs. A black and white photograph that has good contrast as…

Quick Tip: Smooth It Out

Create a smooth' uniform surface on the shelf side of your fired work—not a brush stroke in sight! First' prepare a kilnshelf with Bullseye Shelf Primer. Follow the instructions in our free video Preparing Kiln…

What size French Cleat do I need?

Overview Once you know the total weight of your piece' use this chart to select the right cleat(s). For more tips' download our What size French Cleat do I need' PDF.  More Information What size French Cleat do I…

Quick Tip: Reaction Action

When certain Bullseye glasses are fired in contact with one another' their chemistries interact at the interface to create many effects and colors too. Here are close-up examples of some of our favorite reactions' including…

Quick Tip: Raise the Bar on Your Soap Dish

Add an accent color—and functionality—to your new soap dish with a little help from Bullseye fusible rods! We paired Robin’s Egg Blue Opalescent with Driftwood Gray rod' but you could use any combination.   Step…

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Soap Dish

In this project, use sheet glass, rod, and a soap dish mold to create functional dishes with raised elements that elevate your soap from the dish. This step-by-step process uses basic glass-cutting principles, demonstrates the applicat…

Multicolor Screen Printing with Color Line Pastes

Color Line Screen Pastes are a great alternative to working with powdered enamels for screen printing on glass. Because they come pre-mixed into a medium, there is no need to mix powders. Just open the container, stir with a palette kn…

Screen Printing Basics with Color Line Pastes

In our two-part lesson Screen Printing with Enamels, we covered how to print on glass using powdered enamels added to a liquid medium. While this is a very effective and accessible process, using powdered enamels requires local ventila…

Artists at Work: Dustin Sherron

Color Line Paints make it easy to create imagery on glass just as you would on canvas. These lead-free enamels are ready to use directly out of the container and can be mixed to create additional hues.In this lesson, artist Dustin Sher…

Laser-Printed Sepia Decals

In this project-based lesson, we will take a photograph and make it into a laser-printed decal. Then we'll fire the decal onto glass to make a fused and slumped plate.This process works with laser printers because the toner they use co…

Petrified Wood Bowl

In this project-based lesson, we'll work with a streaky sheet glass style called Petrified Wood. We'll cover some of the basic characteristics of this style, which contains a unique combination of reactive glasses that develop with hea…

Artists at Work: Narcissus Quagliata

In the summer of 2015, artist Narcissus Quagliata came to Bullseye's Research and Education studio in Portland, Oregon, to create a new work of art in fused glass.Although universally considered a master of this medium, he stated that …

Boiled Glass

Boiling liquid is the action of bringing a liquid to the temperature at which it bubbles and turns to vapor. Boiling glass is the action of bringing layers of sheet glass and crushed glass frit to extremely high process temperatures wh…

Working with Rolled Edges

Every handmade sheet of glass produced at Bullseye starts off the same way: as blob of molten glass passing through a set of rollers. Sheet glass emerges from this process with irregular, rounded edges, often referred to as “roll…

Tips for Tack Fusing

Tack fusing is an effective method for creating textured works in kilnformed glass.In tack fusing, glass is fired within a range that creates enough heatwork for the material to fuse while maintaining the desired amount of form and tex…

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What can I expect from Bullseye glass?

Read our full overview of "What To Expect From Bullseye Glass".

Where can I get answers to frequently asked customer service and sales questions?

For frequently asked customer service and/or sales questions, please visit the Customer Service/Sales FAQ section in our online store.  If you don't see the answer to your question there, please give our sales department a call…

Is Bullseye glass microwave/dishwasher safe?

To keep it looking great for years to come, we recommend treating your fused glass artwork the way you would fine china or crystal: Keep it out of the microwave and dishwasher. Microwaves can heat unevenly and this, in turn, can lead…

How big are the individual granules of frit? If applying Bullseye frit with a sifter, what size mesh screen will I need?

Bullseye frit granules come in five sizes: extra large (available in clear only), coarse, medium, fine, and powder. We recommend applying frit with a sifter, as there are a number of interesting effects that can be…

What is Bullseye's glass coding system?

Every piece of Bullseye glass you buy is named with a precise code. The code provides information including color, texture, treatment, thickness and form or shape. Download the Bullseye Glass Coding System PDF FAQs Return to…

Is Bullseye glass COE 90?

Unfortunately, the answer to this question is not simple.  The intent of most glass fusers who ask this question is to find out if Bullseye glass is compatible with glass made by another manufacturer. But COE ("coeffecient of…

What are "striking" glass colors?

  Some Bullseye glasses appear pale or colorless in the cold sheet form, but “strike” or mature to a much different color when fired. Striking colors can vary, depending on temperature, atmosphere, and heat history. Producing…

Is Bullseye glass compatible in all conditions?

When kilnforming, there are a multitude of variables to keep in mind. If you plan to subject Bullseye glass to unusual working conditions, we always recommend conducting your own tests. Under normal working conditions, Bullseye…

What can I expect from Bullseye rods?

Bullseye rods are an accessory glass that can be added to kilnforming projects to create a variety of unique design elements. In the production of Bullseye rods, five characteristics are evaluated: Compatibility: Bullseye…

Is Bullseye glass food safe?

Listed below are the Bullseye glasses that contain more than 1.0% lead or more than 0.5% cadmium. If you use any of these styles for food-bearing objects, we recommend capping them with Bullseye clear glass. In our testing, we have…