Content Browser | Methods & Ideas
  • All

  • Articles

  • Video Lessons

  • FAQ

Screen Printing Basics with Color Line Pastes

In our two-part lesson Screen Printing with Enamels, we covered how to print on glass using powdered enamels added to a liquid medium. While this is a very effective and accessible process, using powdered enamels requires local ventila…

What are "striking" glass colors?

  Some Bullseye glasses appear pale or colorless in the cold sheet form but “strike” or mature to a much different color when fired. Striking colors can vary depending on temperature atmosphere and heat history. Producing strikers read more

Artists at Work: Dustin Sherron

Color Line Paints make it easy to create imagery on glass just as you would on canvas. These lead-free enamels are ready to use directly out of the container and can be mixed to create additional hues.In this lesson, artist Dustin Sher…

Laser-Printed Sepia Decals

In this project-based lesson, we will take a photograph and make it into a laser-printed decal. Then we'll fire the decal onto glass to make a fused and slumped plate.This process works with laser printers because the toner they use co…

Petrified Wood Bowl

In this project-based lesson, we'll work with a streaky sheet glass style called Petrified Wood. We'll cover some of the basic characteristics of this style, which contains a unique combination of reactive glasses that develop with hea…

Basic Elements of Design

The Elements of Design are the basic components that make up an artwork. They are line, shape, texture, form and color. In this lesson, we'll define each of these elements and discuss ways you can incorporate them in kiln-glass project…

Artists at Work: Narcissus Quagliata

In the summer of 2015, artist Narcissus Quagliata came to Bullseye's Research and Education studio in Portland, Oregon, to create a new work of art in fused glass.Although universally considered a master of this medium, he stated that …

Boiled Glass

Boiling liquid is the action of bringing a liquid to the temperature at which it bubbles and turns to vapor. Boiling glass is the action of bringing layers of sheet glass and crushed glass frit to extremely high process temperatures wh…

Working with Rolled Edges

Every handmade sheet of glass produced at Bullseye starts off the same way: as blob of molten glass passing through a set of rollers. Sheet glass emerges from this process with irregular, rounded edges, often referred to as “roll…

Is Bullseye glass COE 90?

Unfortunately the answer to this question is not simple.  The intent of most glass fusers who ask this question is to find out if Bullseye glass is compatible with glass made by another manufacturer. But COE ("coeffecient of expansion") read more

First << PreviousPage 1 of 19Next >> Last

Quick Tip: Opaline Overlays

Style codes for glasses above' White (000113-0030)' Driftwood Gray (000132-0030)' Elephant Gray (000206-0030)' Deco Gray (000136-0030)' Slate Gray (000236-0030)' Black (000100-0030)   Opaline sheet glass. Amazing…

Using Fusible Decal Paper to Transfer Laser Printed Images

Overview With this paper you can make a decal out of any image that you can print on a laser printer' including letters' numbers' line art' graphics' or even photographs. A black and white photograph that has good contrast as…

Quick Tip: Smooth It Out

Create a smooth' uniform surface on the shelf side of your fired work—not a brush stroke in sight! First' prepare a kilnshelf with Bullseye Shelf Primer. Follow the instructions in our free video Preparing Kiln…

What size French Cleat do I need?

Overview Once you know the total weight of your piece' use this chart to select the right cleat(s). For more tips' download our What size French Cleat do I need' PDF.  More Information What size French Cleat do I…

Quick Tip: Reaction Action

When certain Bullseye glasses are fired in contact with one another' their chemistries interact at the interface to create many effects and colors too. Here are close-up examples of some of our favorite reactions' including…

Quick Tip: Raise the Bar on Your Soap Dish

Add an accent color—and functionality—to your new soap dish with a little help from Bullseye fusible rods! We paired Robin’s Egg Blue Opalescent with Driftwood Gray rod' but you could use any combination.   Step…

Using Color Line Screen Paste

Overview Color line screen paste offers the ability to add high-pigmentation design elements and imagery onto sheet glass with no powdered enamels to mix. Pastes come ready to print' and are available in a wide range of…

Mold Tips: Heart Casting Mold (8976)

More Information Mold Tips' Heart Casting Mold (8976) PDF Helpful Resources Clean Shield Gel product useFrit Tinting articleFrit tinting videoMold Tips' Suggested Slumping SchedulesTips for Using Bullseye Slumping…

Quick Tip: Working with Petrified Wood

Petrified Wood is Bullseye’s magical unicorn streaky. Its unique combination of glasses results in dramatic internal reactions at full-fuse temperatures. Here are two ideas for making this glass sing.   Copper…

Quick Tip: Fresh Palette Picks

“Greenery is symbolic of new beginnings.” —Pantone Color giant Pantone has named Greenery their 2017 Color of the Year. We’ve had green (and new beginnings) on our minds lately' too. So we’ve created an inspiring set…

First<< PreviousPage 1 of 10...Next >> Last

Screen Printing Basics with Color Line Pastes

In our two-part lesson Screen Printing with Enamels, we covered how to print on glass using powdered enamels added to a liquid medium. While this is a very effective and accessible process, using powdered enamels requires local ventila…

Artists at Work: Dustin Sherron

Color Line Paints make it easy to create imagery on glass just as you would on canvas. These lead-free enamels are ready to use directly out of the container and can be mixed to create additional hues.In this lesson, artist Dustin Sher…

Laser-Printed Sepia Decals

In this project-based lesson, we will take a photograph and make it into a laser-printed decal. Then we'll fire the decal onto glass to make a fused and slumped plate.This process works with laser printers because the toner they use co…

Petrified Wood Bowl

In this project-based lesson, we'll work with a streaky sheet glass style called Petrified Wood. We'll cover some of the basic characteristics of this style, which contains a unique combination of reactive glasses that develop with hea…

Artists at Work: Narcissus Quagliata

In the summer of 2015, artist Narcissus Quagliata came to Bullseye's Research and Education studio in Portland, Oregon, to create a new work of art in fused glass.Although universally considered a master of this medium, he stated that …

Boiled Glass

Boiling liquid is the action of bringing a liquid to the temperature at which it bubbles and turns to vapor. Boiling glass is the action of bringing layers of sheet glass and crushed glass frit to extremely high process temperatures wh…

Working with Rolled Edges

Every handmade sheet of glass produced at Bullseye starts off the same way: as blob of molten glass passing through a set of rollers. Sheet glass emerges from this process with irregular, rounded edges, often referred to as “roll…

Tips for Tack Fusing

Tack fusing is an effective method for creating textured works in kilnformed glass.In tack fusing, glass is fired within a range that creates enough heatwork for the material to fuse while maintaining the desired amount of form and tex…

Considerations for Multiple Firings

There are many reasons you might need to fire a project multiple times to achieve a desired result. Some of the most common include:• Fusing and slumping in two separate firings• Firing components that will later be incorpora…

Kilncarved Billet

Creating a low-relief glass sculpture often requires a complex plaster-silica mold-making process. Kilncarving is a simple casting process that uses ceramic fiber paper and the right amount of heat to achieve similar results.In our Kil…

First<< PreviousPage 1 of 10...Next >> Last

How do I use Bullseye slumping molds?

You can start by reading Tips for Using Bullseye Slumping Molds. Since different molds require different firing schedules, you'll have to experiment, ask questions, and gain hands-on experience to become an expert in planning the…

How do I restrain glass flow?

Restraining glass flow requires the use of kiln furniture such as side walls and dams.  In Tipsheet 3: Working Deep and TipSheet 5: Bullseye Box Casting, we discuss the fundamentals of using these tools in the context of…

How do I make tiles?

Simple tiles are among the easiest objects to make in fused glass. While our TipSheets don't specifically address tile-making, we have several with enough basic information to get you started. Take a look at TipSheet 7:…

How do I make a desktop?

Making a glass desktop can be a complex project, requiring a fair amount of experience and specialized equipment. If you're serious about making a desktop, we recommend that you take basic kilnforming classes to learn about the…

How do I program a Paragon kiln to go as fast as possible?

Paragon kilns are great kilns for the home studio or workshop.  We recommend them for their high quality and ease of use. In order to get a Paragon kiln to heat or cool as quickly as possible, simply enter the rate…

How do I prevent glass from sticking to kiln shelves?

Hot glass will adhere to kiln shelves if not prevented by a separator. For most basic kilnforming projects, Bullseye Shelf Primer is an ideal separator. It's affordable, highly effective, and easy to use. See Using Bullseye Shelf…

How do I prepare shelves for a large kiln?

Glad you asked! Please read our detailed instructions in TechNote 6: Preparing the Shelf System for a Large Kiln. Related Questions How do I make a desktop'How do I restrain glass flow'Can I make my project at Bullseye…

How do I know whether to use Standard 3 mm glass or Thin (2 mm) glass?

Consider the 6-millimeter rule: When heated to full fusing temperatures, most Bullseye sheets will naturally assume a thickness of about 6 millimeters unless constrained by dams or molds. For projects like plates and tiles, you…

How do I get rid of sharp edges on my project?

There are many ways to remove sharp edges from your project.  You will need to assess your project and the type of edges you're dealing with, and decide which tools and processes are best. Tools may include anything from…

What is devitrification or "devit"?

Devitrification ("devit") is the growth of crystalline structures within or on the surface of glass. ("Vitri" = glass; "devitrification" = the process of becoming un-glasslike). Devit can result from firing too slowly through the…