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How and why should I clean glass before firing it?

Glass should always be cleaned before it is fired in a kiln. Cleaning glass removes problem-causing contaminants like glass-cutting fluid oils minerals salts dusts fibers sticker residues pen marks and fingerprints. These contaminants read more

What can I expect from Bullseye rods?

Bullseye rods are an accessory glass that can be added to kilnforming projects to create a variety of unique design elements. In the production of Bullseye rods five characteristics are evaluated Compatibility Bullseye Compatible read more

Is Bullseye glass compatible in all conditions?

When kilnforming there are a multitude of variables to keep in mind. If you plan to subject Bullseye glass to unusual working conditions we always recommend conducting your own tests. Under normal working conditions Bullseye glasses read more

What are "striking" glass colors?

  Some Bullseye glasses appear pale or colorless in the cold sheet form but “strike” or mature to a much different color when fired. Striking colors can vary depending on temperature atmosphere and heat history. Producing strikers read more

Is Bullseye glass COE 90?

Unfortunately the answer to this question is not simple.  The intent of most glass fusers who ask this question is to find out if Bullseye glass is compatible with glass made by another manufacturer. But COE ("coeffecient of expansion") read more

How big are the individual granules of frit? If applying Bullseye frit with a sifter, what size mesh screen will I need?

Bullseye frit granules come in five sizes extra large (available in clear only) coarse medium fine and powder. We recommend applying frit with a sifter as there are a number of interesting effects that can be achieved. Bullseye extra read more

Is Bullseye glass microwave/dishwasher safe?

To keep it looking great for years to come we recommend treating your fused glass artwork the way you would fine china or crystal Keep it out of the microwave and dishwasher. Microwaves can heat unevenly and this in turn can lead to cracked read more

How do I know which Bullseye clear glass to use?

Tekta is Bullseye's signature style of clear glass. Bullseye manufactures two styles of its Tekta glass Tekta Clear and Tekta Crystal Clear. Tekta Crystal Clear is recommended for crystal clarity especially in thicker works. Compare read more

Why should I choose Bullseye glass over other glasses?

When you buy Bullseye glass you're investing in top-quality materials and technical resources Our standards for testing and quality are the highest in the industry and our products are unsurpassed for consistency and reliability read more

What is The Rule of Halves?

This rule is important to know for successful glass cutting. A score is more likely to run properly when there are equal amounts of glass on either side of it. This is particularly important for cutting strips of glass. Related read more

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Pre-Firing Your New Kiln

Overview Before using a new kiln for glass projects' you will need to pre-fire it. This burns out binders' moisture' and other residue left over from the manufacturing process. Read and download the PDF file' Pre-Firing…

Quick Tip: Little Wisp Bowls

Create your own streaky color palette. Layer Clear and White Streaky sheet glass over transparent tint glass styles. Slump in the Cone Bowl mold to upturn the edges and achieve luscious color at the rim. We’re making bowls…

Glossary

Anneal' To cool previously heated glass through a specific temperature range in order to relieve excessive stress once the glass reaches room temperature. Annealer' More accurately called an annealing kiln or annealing oven. A…

Quick Tip: Opaline Overlays

Style codes for glasses above' White (000113-0030)' Driftwood Gray (000132-0030)' Elephant Gray (000206-0030)' Deco Gray (000136-0030)' Slate Gray (000236-0030)' Black (000100-0030)   Opaline sheet glass. Amazing…

Using Fusible Decal Paper to Transfer Laser Printed Images

Overview With this paper you can make a decal out of any image that you can print on a laser printer' including letters' numbers' line art' graphics' or even photographs. A black and white photograph that has good contrast as…

Quick Tip: Smooth It Out

Create a smooth' uniform surface on the shelf side of your fired work—not a brush stroke in sight! First' prepare a kilnshelf with Bullseye Shelf Primer. Follow the instructions in our free video Preparing Kiln…

What size French Cleat do I need?

Overview Once you know the total weight of your piece' use this chart to select the right cleat(s). For more tips' download our What size French Cleat do I need' PDF.  More Information What size French Cleat do I…

Quick Tip: Reaction Action

When certain Bullseye glasses are fired in contact with one another' their chemistries interact at the interface to create many effects and colors too. Here are close-up examples of some of our favorite reactions' including…

Quick Tip: Raise the Bar on Your Soap Dish

Add an accent color—and functionality—to your new soap dish with a little help from Bullseye fusible rods! We paired Robin’s Egg Blue Opalescent with Driftwood Gray rod' but you could use any combination.   Step…

Using Color Line Screen Paste

Overview Color line screen paste offers the ability to add high-pigmentation design elements and imagery onto sheet glass with no powdered enamels to mix. Pastes come ready to print' and are available in a wide range of…

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Glass Cutting

With the proper tools and techniques even beginners can produce clean, accurate glass shapes for kilnforming projects. In this lesson you will learn everything you need to get started cutting sheet glass.…

Glass Cleaning

Substances like dusts, oils and fingerprints must be removed from glass before it's fired or they may be visible in the finished work. In this lesson you will learn how to clean glass properly to avoid problems caused by surface contam…

Firing: Basic Principles

A firing schedule is a set of instructions that tells the kiln how to heat and cool during the glass-forming process. In this lesson you will learn the eight basic steps that make up a firing schedule and why they are important.…

Firing: Basic Applications

In the “Firing: Basic Principles” lesson, you learned the eight steps that make up a firing schedule. In this lesson you will use those eight steps to design firing schedules for fusing, tack-fusing and slumping a platter with a te…

Drawing with Glass

Drawing with crushed glass powders and frits on sheet glass is a fluid and forgiving approach that allows for a broad range of gesture and precision. In this lesson you will do exercises to become proficient in the method and learn how…

Color Reactions and Special Effects

Yellow + Blue = Brown? When certain glasses are fired in contact with one another, their chemistries interact to create effects and different colors than what one might anticipate, considering how colors normally mix. In this lesson yo…

Coldworking with the Wet Belt Sander

Coldworking methods use tools and processes that do not rely on heat to change the shape or surface texture of glass. In this lesson you will learn to use the wet belt sander to grind and smooth glass edges and achieve a variety of sur…

Linear Reaction Plate

This project is a cleanly designed fused and slumped plate that incorporates reactive sheet glass and stringers. By following the step-by-step instructions you will apply basic plate-making and glass-cutting principles and learn how sp…

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New to using Bullseye Glass?

 "Your choice of glass is probably the most important decision you will make as a kilnformer." -Artist Steve Immerman on why he exclusively uses Bullseye. Bullseye glass is developed by artists, for artists. We've got your…

Is it safe to fire Bullseye Glass in a kiln?

Yes. At cold temperatures and typical firing temperatures, the colorants are encapsulated in the glass and the glass does not emit odors or toxics into the air. However, ventilation is recommended to dissipate odors from shelf…

What is The Rule of Halves?

This rule is important to know for successful glass cutting. A score is more likely to run properly when there are equal amounts of glass on either side of it. This is particularly important for cutting strips of…

Why should I choose Bullseye glass over other glasses?

When you buy Bullseye glass, you're investing in top-quality materials and technical resources: Our standards for testing and quality are the highest in the industry and our products are unsurpassed for consistency and…

How do I know which Bullseye clear glass to use?

Tekta is Bullseye's signature style of clear glass. Bullseye manufactures two styles of its Tekta glass: Tekta Clear and Tekta Crystal Clear. Tekta Crystal Clear is recommended for crystal clarity, especially in thicker works.…

Can I get samples of your glass?

Yes. Our popular sample sets for sheet glass, billets, and rods are great resources for any studio. Note that these samples are for color reference only. They are not intended for reheating and may not be fusible.

Is there bubble-free glass?

Bubbles are found in all handcrafted glasses. They contribute to the art and beauty of finished glasswork. You can learn to minimize bubble formation or to create bubble patterns and effects by reading TechNotes 5: Volume &…

What are Special Production glasses?

Occasionally we produce limited runs of top grade glass styles that are not included in our regular product line. We refer to these as “Special Production” sheets. Special Production sheets may be one-of-a-kind or available in…

What are Curious glasses?

The grading system for our handmade glass demands that each sheet match a target color and have a uniform appearance to receive first-quality grade. Glass that is not quite the target color or that has some other…

Is all Bullseye glass recommended for fusing?

No, but all of our glass goes through a rigorous quality assessment and assigned a grade. Our top-quality sheet glass comes in two grades: Fusible and Standard (non-fusible). Fusible glass is coded as “F” and Standard or…

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