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Laser-Printed Sepia Decals

In this project-based lesson, we will take a photograph and make it into a laser-printed decal. Then we'll fire the decal onto glass to make a fused and slumped plate.This process works with laser printers because the toner they use co…

Petrified Wood Bowl

In this project-based lesson, we'll work with a streaky sheet glass style called Petrified Wood. We'll cover some of the basic characteristics of this style, which contains a unique combination of reactive glasses that develop with hea…

Basic Elements of Design

The Elements of Design are the basic components that make up an artwork. They are line, shape, texture, form and color. In this lesson, we'll define each of these elements and discuss ways you can incorporate them in kiln-glass project…

Artists at Work: Narcissus Quagliata

In the summer of 2015, artist Narcissus Quagliata came to Bullseye's Research and Education studio in Portland, Oregon, to create a new work of art in fused glass.Although universally considered a master of this medium, he stated that …

Boiled Glass

Boiling liquid is the action of bringing a liquid to the temperature at which it bubbles and turns to vapor. Boiling glass is the action of bringing layers of sheet glass and crushed glass frit to extremely high process temperatures wh…

Working with Rolled Edges

Every handmade sheet of glass produced at Bullseye starts off the same way: as blob of molten glass passing through a set of rollers. Sheet glass emerges from this process with irregular, rounded edges, often referred to as “roll…

Is Bullseye glass COE 90?

Unfortunately the answer to this question is not simple.  The intent of most glass fusers who ask this question is to find out if Bullseye glass is compatible with glass made by another manufacturer. But COE ("coeffecient of expansion") read more

Tips for Tack Fusing

Tack fusing is an effective method for creating textured works in kilnformed glass.In tack fusing, glass is fired within a range that creates enough heatwork for the material to fuse while maintaining the desired amount of form and tex…

Considerations for Multiple Firings

There are many reasons you might need to fire a project multiple times to achieve a desired result. Some of the most common include:• Fusing and slumping in two separate firings• Firing components that will later be incorpora…

New to using Bullseye Glass?

 "Your choice of glass is probably the most important decision you will make as a kilnformer." -Artist Steve Immerman on why he exclusively uses Bullseye. Bullseye glass is developed by artists for artists. We've got your back! A read more

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Using Fusible Decal Paper to Transfer Laser Printed Images

Overview With this paper you can make a decal out of any image that you can print on a laser printer' including letters' numbers' line art' graphics' or even photographs. A black and white photograph that has good contrast…

Quick Tip: Smooth It Out

Create a smooth' uniform surface on the shelf side of your fired work—not a brush stroke in sight! First' prepare a kilnshelf with Bullseye Shelf Primer. Follow the instructions in our free video Preparing Kiln…

What size French Cleat do I need?

Overview Once you know the total weight of your piece' use this chart to select the right cleat(s). For more tips' download our What size French Cleat do I need' PDF.  More Information What size French Cleat do I…

Quick Tip: Reaction Action

When certain Bullseye glasses are fired in contact with one another' their chemistries interact at the interface to create many effects and colors too. Here are close-up examples of some of our favorite reactions' including…

Quick Tip: Raise the Bar on Your Soap Dish

Add an accent color—and functionality—to your new soap dish with a little help from Bullseye fusible rods! We paired Robin’s Egg Blue Opalescent with Driftwood Gray rod' but you could use any combination.   Step…

Using Color Line Screen Paste

Overview Color line screen paste offers the ability to add high-pigmentation design elements and imagery onto sheet glass with no powdered enamels to mix. Pastes come ready to print' and are available in a wide range of…

Mold Tips: Heart Casting Mold (8976)

More Information Mold Tips' Heart Casting Mold (8976) PDF Helpful Resources Clean Shield Gel product useFrit Tinting articleFrit tinting videoMold Tips' Suggested Slumping SchedulesTips for Using Bullseye Slumping…

Quick Tip: Working with Petrified Wood

Petrified Wood is Bullseye’s magical unicorn streaky. Its unique combination of glasses results in dramatic internal reactions at full-fuse temperatures. Here are two ideas for making this glass sing.   Copper…

Quick Tip: Fresh Palette Picks

“Greenery is symbolic of new beginnings.” —Pantone Color giant Pantone has named Greenery their 2017 Color of the Year. We’ve had green (and new beginnings) on our minds lately' too. So we’ve created an inspiring set…

Quick Tip: Circles from Squares

You can create nicely rounded cabochons from stacks of 0.75"(20 x 20 mm) squares' thanks to heat' gravity' and the 6 Millimeter Rule. But be careful' they’re addictive! The StackTop (6 mm)' A “lensing” layer of…

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Kilncarved Sconce Project

Imagine having the capability to realize your vision of the ideal luminaire. In this lesson, we'll demonstrate how to design and fabricate your own lighting sconce.We’ll use a process called kilncarving to create a diffuser of varyin…

Pâte de Verre Bowl

Pâte de verre is a casting method that involves hand-packing layers of glass in a refractory mold. In French, the term literally means “paste of glass.” You can use this method to make a variety of forms. These include vessels, sc…

Alchemy Clear Drop-Out Bowls

Bullseye's Alchemy Clear sheet glass styles change the appearance of silver foil that is fired in direct contact with the glass. One style changes the silver to gold, the other changes it to bronze.These effects are the result of the c…

Opaline Ring Bowl

Bullseye's Opaline sheet glass scatters light, creating a range of effects on base colors. In this project-based lesson, we'll make a bowl using a palette of Opaline, Clear, and Pine Green.In the process, you'll learn how to intercut s…

Drawing with Glass Powder

Drawing with glass powder is a great way to explore and develop ideas. The technique frees you from the preciousness of the material, allowing you to relax and take pleasure in drawing.In this lesson, you'll see how three people respon…

Frit Tinting

Frit tinting is a technique for creating specific color blends by adding colored glass powder to Clear frit. It broadens the palette available to you, making possible colors that are often difficult to achieve in kilncasting, such as r…

Drawing with Vitrigraph Stringer

On a cold and rainy day in November, we invited three artists into the kilnforming studio at Bullseye Glass. They were each given half-sheets of white glass, a pile of vitrigraph stringers, and time to draw with those stringers.We deci…

Making Multiple Wax Models

If you plan to kilncast multiple copies of an object, you may need to make multiple wax models of that object.In this lesson, you'll learn how to create a wax model. We'll start with this plastic mold used in our lesson, “Day of …

Cascade Chevron Plate

Bullseye Cascade sheet glass opens up a wealth of creative possibilities. One option is to use it to make chevron designs.In this lesson, you'll learn about the characteristics of Cascade sheet glass, effective methods for cutting narr…

Flameworking and Kilnforming

Flamework is a glass forming method that involves using heat from a torch to shape and sometimes bond glass.In the first part of this lesson, you'll learn about flameworking and how to make some basic flameworked elements. Then, we'll …

New to using Bullseye Glass?

 "Your choice of glass is probably the most important decision you will make as a kilnformer." -Artist Steve Immerman on why he exclusively uses Bullseye. Bullseye glass is developed by artists, for artists. We've got…

Is it safe to fire Bullseye Glass in a kiln?

Yes. At cold temperatures and typical firing temperatures, the colorants are encapsulated in the glass and the glass does not emit odors or toxics into the air. However, ventilation is recommended to dissipate odors from shelf…

What is The Rule of Halves?

This rule is important to know for successful glass cutting. A score is more likely to run properly when there are equal amounts of glass on either side of it. This is particularly important for cutting strips of…

Why should I choose Bullseye glass over other glasses?

When you buy Bullseye glass, you're investing in top-quality materials and technical resources: Our standards for testing and quality are the highest in the industry and our products are unsurpassed for consistency and…

How do I know which Bullseye clear glass to use?

Tekta is Bullseye's signature style of clear glass. Bullseye manufactures two styles of its Tekta glass: Tekta Clear and Tekta Crystal Clear. Tekta Crystal Clear is recommended for crystal clarity, especially in thicker works.…

Can I get samples of your glass?

Yes. Our popular sample sets for sheet glass, billets, and rods are great resources for any studio. Note that these samples are for color reference only. They are not intended for reheating and may not be fusible.

Is there bubble-free glass?

Bubbles are found in all handcrafted glasses. They contribute to the art and beauty of finished glasswork. You can learn to minimize bubble formation or to create bubble patterns and effects by reading TechNotes 5: Volume &…

What are Special Production glasses?

Occasionally we produce limited runs of top grade glass styles that are not included in our regular product line. We refer to these as “Special Production” sheets. Special Production sheets may be one-of-a-kind or available in…

What are Curious glasses?

The grading system for our handmade glass demands that each sheet match a target color and have a uniform appearance to receive first-quality grade. Glass that is not quite the target color or that has some other…

Is all Bullseye glass recommended for fusing?

No, but all of our glass goes through a rigorous quality assessment and assigned a grade. Our top-quality sheet glass comes in two grades: Fusible and Standard (non-fusible). Fusible glass is coded as “F” and Standard or…

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