Content Browser | Methods & Ideas

  • All

  • Articles

  • FAQ

What types of kilncasting can I do?

Kilncasting projects generally fall into one of two broad categories those which are made in open-faced molds and those that are made in closed or semi-closed molds. In open-faced molds one side of the mold is left completely open. read more

What molds are used for kilncasting?

Molds for kilncasting fall into two broad categories open-faced or closed/semi-closed. In open-faced molds one side of the mold is completely open; the cold glass is placed directly into the mold through that opening. Using open-faced read more

What kiln should I use for casting?

Almost any kiln that will fit your mold setup will work.  The most important thing to consider when selecting a kiln for casting work is whether there will be plenty of room around the mold to allow for uniform heating and cooling. In read more

What is investment?

Investment is a mixture of materials used to make a mold. In general investment mixes for kilncasting glass are composed of three basic ingredients a binder a refractory and modifiers. Some artists use readymade investment mixes like read more

What form of glass do I use for kilncasting?

Different casting methods and desired outcomes will necessitate different forms of glass.  For example if working in the pate de verre method you will want to use frits and powders.  Whereas when working in the box casting method read more

What firing schedule do I use for casting?

As with nearly all kilnforming projects the answer will vary depending on a number of factors such as the mold you're using the process you're using as well as the glass you're using. For example a pâte de verre firing schedule would read more

What equipment do I need for kilncasting?

At the very least you'll need a kiln kiln furniture and a suitable work surface. The rest depends entirely on the scale and type of casting you plan to do.  Two of the most popular kilncasting processes are box casting and lost wax read more

My casting cracked. How can I fix it?

That depends entirely on the piece and the crack. Some cracks can be fixed relatively easily while for others it might not be worth it. If it's a large crack or one that's is in the interior of the piece you'll probably need to recast. read more

My casting cracked. Can I put it back in the mold and refire?

Theoretically in certain cases it is possible to reinvest the cracked piece and recast it.  But if the mold was damaged while removing the cracked piece you will need to make a new mold. And while a damaged piece can be repaired the amount read more

How large can my casting be?

Your casting can be as large as your kiln will allow. As a rule of thumb the interior of the kiln should be at least twice the height of the final casting or more depending on your setup. For large castings one of the most important read more

Murakami SP-9500 Diazo Sensitizer Mixing Instructions

Overview Murakami's premier dual cure graphic emulsion. Outstanding resolution of fine details. An easy to use emulsion with wide latitude and exceptional durability. For instructions' download our Diazo Mixing Instructions…

Quick Tip: On the Edge with Transparents

Transparents transform with on-edge strip construction Cut 3mm sheet glass into 1cm wide strips' turn those on edge' and—presto!—color saturation increases. In the pairings below' notice how the 1cm thick on-edge samples…

Quick Tip: Fritfetti

Say yes to sprinkles! Steps (4 firings) Make frit balls with Medium Frit. See Quick Tip' Frit Balls. Cut 7” (approx. 18cm) circles. You’ll need 3 circles of Clear and one of each opalescent style to make the…

Pre-Firing Your New Kiln

Overview Before using a new kiln for glass projects' you will need to pre-fire it. This burns out binders' moisture' and other residue left over from the manufacturing process. Read and download the PDF file' Pre-Firing…

Quick Tip: Little Wisp Bowls

Create your own streaky color palette. Layer Clear and White Streaky sheet glass over transparent tint glass styles. Slump in the Cone Bowl mold to upturn the edges and achieve luscious color at the rim. We’re making bowls…

Glossary

Anneal' To cool previously heated glass through a specific temperature range in order to relieve excessive stress once the glass reaches room temperature. Annealer' More accurately called an annealing kiln or annealing oven. A…

Quick Tip: Opaline Overlays

Style codes for glasses above' White (000113-0030)' Driftwood Gray (000132-0030)' Elephant Gray (000206-0030)' Deco Gray (000136-0030)' Slate Gray (000236-0030)' Black (000100-0030)   Opaline sheet glass. Amazing…

Using Fusible Decal Paper to Transfer Laser Printed Images

Overview With this paper you can make a decal out of any image that you can print on a laser printer' including letters' numbers' line art' graphics' or even photographs. A black and white photograph that has good contrast as…

Quick Tip: Smooth It Out

Create a smooth' uniform surface on the shelf side of your fired work—not a brush stroke in sight! First' prepare a kilnshelf with Bullseye Shelf Primer. Follow the instructions in our free video Preparing Kiln…

First<< PreviousPage 1 of 10...Next >> Last

New to using Bullseye Glass?

 "Your choice of glass is probably the most important decision you will make as a kilnformer." -Artist Steve Immerman on why he exclusively uses Bullseye. Bullseye glass is developed by artists, for artists. We've got your…

Is it safe to fire Bullseye Glass in a kiln?

Yes. At cold temperatures and typical firing temperatures, the colorants are encapsulated in the glass and the glass does not emit odors or toxics into the air. However, ventilation is recommended to dissipate odors from shelf…

What is The Rule of Halves?

This rule is important to know for successful glass cutting. A score is more likely to run properly when there are equal amounts of glass on either side of it. This is particularly important for cutting strips of…

Why should I choose Bullseye glass over other glasses?

When you buy Bullseye glass, you're investing in top-quality materials and technical resources: Our standards for testing and quality are the highest in the industry and our products are unsurpassed for consistency and…

How do I know which Bullseye clear glass to use?

Tekta is Bullseye's signature style of clear glass. Bullseye manufactures two styles of its Tekta glass: Tekta Clear and Tekta Crystal Clear. Tekta Crystal Clear is recommended for crystal clarity, especially in thicker works.…

Can I get samples of your glass?

Yes. Our popular sample sets for sheet glass, billets, and rods are great resources for any studio. Note that these samples are for color reference only. They are not intended for reheating and may not be fusible.

Is there bubble-free glass?

Bubbles are found in all handcrafted glasses. They contribute to the art and beauty of finished glasswork. You can learn to minimize bubble formation or to create bubble patterns and effects by reading TechNotes 5: Volume &…

What are Special Production glasses?

Occasionally we produce limited runs of top grade glass styles that are not included in our regular product line. We refer to these as “Special Production” sheets. Special Production sheets may be one-of-a-kind or available in…

What are Curious glasses?

The grading system for our handmade glass demands that each sheet match a target color and have a uniform appearance to receive first-quality grade. Glass that is not quite the target color or that has some other…

Is all Bullseye glass recommended for fusing?

No, but all of our glass goes through a rigorous quality assessment and assigned a grade. Our top-quality sheet glass comes in two grades: Fusible and Standard (non-fusible). Fusible glass is coded as “F” and Standard or…

First<< PreviousPage 1 of 9...Next >> Last