Monthly Archives: March 2014

You know that old chestnut about necessity being the mother of invention? Nowhere is it more true than in a kiln-glass studio. At least in mine. I’ve repeatedly found myself having to research subjects about which I was completely ignorant, learning a new skill (such as brazing stainless steel for a sculpture base), or experimenting with an unusual new material.

Mica in the raw. I collected this from an old quarry.

Case in point: I’ve been working with glass frit powder in a variation of the pate de verre technique, making three-dimensional glass bird feathers. Many real feathers have iridescent surfaces and glint with metallic tints when the light catches them at certain angles. I wanted to figure out a way to emulate this effect, but Bullseye Glass doesn’t manufacture iridescent frit. What to do?

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The research continues…

I owe this shot to Amy Ferber – one of our favorite party girls!

The second most popular interactive display in Bullseye Gallery’s recent Retrospective exhibition was a set of brightly colored cast-glass wedges. It wasn’t designed with children in mind. It was intended to show the range of possibilities in mixing frits and the gradations related to thickness. read more

Art happens.

Kids love glass – or sand pretending to be glass

The Gallery’s most recent exhibition is a didactic one: Retrospective tells the story of a factory that has always worked with artists. The works on display reflect some of those projects. Among my favorites are those done in the “painting with glass” methods that have flowed out of sessions with masters like Narcissus Quagliata and his friend Rafael Cauduro. read more