The difference between a blog and Facebook?

On a blog, no one talks to you. Ask a question? Good luck. On Facebook everyone is so busy yabbering that your questions are drowned out by all the other chatter. But more often than not, people respond. Silly stuff sometimes. But at least you’re heard.

It’s kind of like speaking on stage compared to blathering in the local pub. And with Facebook you don’t really need a prepared speech. Anything seems to fly.

Get AWAY from me with that stupid camera – go embarrass some of your human friends!

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Caveat: the quotes below are not verbatim, just the imperfect echoes still rattling around my head a day after the jurying of e-merge. There is also no relationship between the images here and the adjacent remarks.

“It’s a Trojan horse…..you barely notice it, then slowly it grabs you and all these ideas start leaping out…”

“I liked the piece a lot….then I read the statement….it had nothing to do with what I felt in looking at the work….that statement killed the piece for me…”

“How can you not love this? Instantly. It just reaches out and touches something that is common to all of us. You know immediately what the artist is saying. Is that wonderful? Or maybe not?”

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If I left the impression with my last post that receiving art is only about crates, delivery receipts, photography, data entry, and insurance claims, it was only a small part of the story. At the bottom of every one of these incoming boxes is an opportunity to see the world through an individual artist’s eyes.

Our Registrar rises from the Bed of the Undead to talk about the e-merge 2010 entries he’s seen so far.

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Somewhere back in Portland, Oregon,  Susan, Janet and a dozen other serious-minded staffers at the Bullseye Glass Company imagine that their leader, Jim – in Chicago for Bullseye Gallery’s showing at SOFA 2009 – is working hard to uphold the supremely professional reputation of the company and the many fine artists its gallery represents.

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Wrong. Made irreparably giddy by the fumes of Sherwin-Williams #7048, the normally no-nonsense Mr Jones has been buzzing about the monkey bars all morning, drunkenly painting and repainting the endless corners and angles that make up the skeleton of Michael Rogers’ Beekeeper’s Staircase.

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………..Don’t walk on the art!

Even if it’s designed to be walked on, climbing up the prototype Michael Rogers staircase would not be a good idea. We’ve suggested as much by making the treads much narrower than standard and starting their rise a couple of feet off the ground.

Plus, the stairs don’t go anywhere. (But lots of people say that about contemporary art).

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