Workshops and projects are in full swing! Special thanks to visiting instructors, Morgan Van Madison, Louise Krampien & Erika Tada. These images were taken at Bullseye Resource Center Portland over the past few weeks.

Creative Concepts in Kilnforming, with Morgan Van Madison:

Thanks for an inspiring workshop, Morgan!

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Artist Lynn Basa in Bullseye's R&E studio

Artist Lynn Basa (center) visits Bullseye's Research & Education studio to check in on the project.

Bullseye is proud to be part of TriMet’s new Portland-Milwaukie light rail line, scheduled start service in September 2015. Our Research and Education team collaborated with the Canadian firm Mosaika to translate Chicago-based artist Lynn Basa‘s paintings into glass mosaics for the shelter columns at the new MAX line stations. read more

When I first saw online images of the glass that had been selected for the Emerge 2014 show, I was puzzled. I couldn’t understand what distinguished these pieces from many of the other images of glass I had looked at online, or why they would be chosen to represent the forefront of emerging contemporary kiln-glass. Then I attended the Emerge 2014 opening at Bullseye Gallery, and realized what I had been missing—and why.

Getting up close and personal with "Barbican" by Harry Morgan

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Last weekend, the hottest of Portland’s summer, Alicia Lomné finished teaching her workshop Pâte de Verre, Methods to Form By. Then, after a quick wardrobe change, she powered through and treated an appreciative audience to a fascinating artist talk about how she does what she does and why she does it. read more

We’ve got plenty of Ponderosa Pine in the Pacific Northwest. It grows in Central Oregon and arrives at Bullseye in truckloads to be made into crating for the sheet glass we make.

Artist Munson Hunt with Ponderosa pine from New Mexico

So why look outside Oregon for more? And why then invite a sculptor whose primary medium is not glass into our factory to turn this wood to charcoal and charcoal to glass? read more

Six days since leaving our shrink-wrapped pallets behind at SOFA Chicago

Fourteen days before arriving at Art Miami

I’m still digesting the lessons learned on Navy Pier. When it’s gelled into something more coherent than I’m capable of today, I’ll put a post together.

In the meantime, the latest news: our SOFA return shipment arrived at the gallery in Portland on Friday. By end-of-day Saturday the tireless gallery team had packed, wrapped, and strapped the Miami pallets that are now waiting for a Monday pick-up.

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This is it with the silly games. I promise. But I can’t resist just one last round. It’s bound to stump even Sarah and Jenn.

For the final (until I change my mind) $25 Resource Center Gift Card, give us the answer to this two-part question:

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I’m back home in Portland, Oregon after five weeks bouncing around Britain, juggling everything from an art fair in London to lamb watching in the Scottish Highlands.

Smack in the middle of it all I got to watch an amazing residency that over eight short days knitted together thirteen artists, two old buildings, and one tiny village  – with a glass thread that I expect to hold strong for years to come.

Day before the residency begins: Steve, Karlyn & Richard experience  the slippery slope outside Harbour House.

It all started with two remarkable artist/teachers, Steve Klein and Richard Parrish and the idea to explore “Kiln-glass in the Built Environment” in a private residency at North Lands Creative Glass.

They called the project “IN PLACE” and over the space of many months selected eleven participants from around the world.

NEXT: The Places.

If I left the impression with my last post that receiving art is only about crates, delivery receipts, photography, data entry, and insurance claims, it was only a small part of the story. At the bottom of every one of these incoming boxes is an opportunity to see the world through an individual artist’s eyes.

Our Registrar rises from the Bed of the Undead to talk about the e-merge 2010 entries he’s seen so far.

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When I started at Bullseye 25 years ago there were 20 of us. I knew everyone. I worked in the warehouse – between preparing export documents and other stuff  (yep. My best day I packed 17 crates of glass – probably still my greatest accomplishment at BE)

“You want me to work where? Doing what?” – moi, circa 1985

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