I’m a glutton for studio visits, especially home studios. An artist surrounded by raw materials, works in progress, finished pieces, ideas in the process of transformation – I’d rather this than the pristine organization of gallery or store any day!

Not that Valerie Adams isn’t organized. Her garage studio last weekend was perfectly arranged to welcome the hundreds of visitors coming through on Sonoma County’s 25th annual ARTrails .

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It’s Art Fair season and our first stop this fall is SOFA CHICAGO.

Think about joining the crowds to see some of the best in glass worldwide. (and some other neat stuff too).

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The difference between a blog and Facebook?

On a blog, no one talks to you. Ask a question? Good luck. On Facebook everyone is so busy yabbering that your questions are drowned out by all the other chatter. But more often than not, people respond. Silly stuff sometimes. But at least you’re heard.

It’s kind of like speaking on stage compared to blathering in the local pub. And with Facebook you don’t really need a prepared speech. Anything seems to fly.

Get AWAY from me with that stupid camera – go embarrass some of your human friends!

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I know, I know. Late again.

My American summer got buried in art fairs, our new Santa Fe resource center and just keeping my head above the flood waters.

I’ve just landed again in the Northern Highlands of Scotland – after an inspiring visit to the International Festival of Glass in Stourbridge – and elated to be back in the place where I and 13 artists left our hearts earlier this summer.

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The traditional houses of northeast Scotland are typically stone, intensely practical, and hauntingly lonely. “Harbour House” is almost iconic in its reflection of the style, a simple, squat, double-gabled building with chimneys on both ends and symmetrical window/door placement on the front that sometimes gives the lime-washed houses a Friendly Ghost face.

That this particular house is perched so tenuously on the steep hill above the village harbour adds power to the metaphor. There is a precariousness to life in this place. A building like Harbour House has survived – for various reasons. Many others in the area have not.

That Parrish and Klein selected Harbour House as one of the two case studies for this residency insured that the participants would have rich material to mine as they considered the place of kiln-glass in the built environment.

And mine they would. But Harbour House was just one way in.

Next: The Other.

I’m back home in Portland, Oregon after five weeks bouncing around Britain, juggling everything from an art fair in London to lamb watching in the Scottish Highlands.

Smack in the middle of it all I got to watch an amazing residency that over eight short days knitted together thirteen artists, two old buildings, and one tiny village  – with a glass thread that I expect to hold strong for years to come.

Day before the residency begins: Steve, Karlyn & Richard experience  the slippery slope outside Harbour House.

It all started with two remarkable artist/teachers, Steve Klein and Richard Parrish and the idea to explore “Kiln-glass in the Built Environment” in a private residency at North Lands Creative Glass.

They called the project “IN PLACE” and over the space of many months selected eleven participants from around the world.

NEXT: The Places.

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In June artist Steve Klein was teaching in La Granja, Spain. By July he had led a professional artist-in-residence program at the Pilchuck Glass School in Washington State. It’s August now and he’s co-teaching a workshop with Kaffe Fassett at North Lands Creative Glass here in Scotland. This fall he’ll be at Bezalel Academy in Jerusalem.

Steve claims to have bad knees. I can’t imagine how much faster he’d move with good ones.

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I’m going to fast forward. We’re into our third day of the fair and still standing. Despite my incessant kvetching, we managed to get through set-up, get the lights focused, glass cleaned and all the clutter crammed into our tiny stand closet, before dashing back to the flat to change and return in time for Opening Night.

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“Can you focus it 2.5 mm to the left and about 1.5mm up, Steve?” Loughlin obsessive? Yet another misunderstood personality.
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Last month I was rudely awakened by the shocking rumor of our corporate-ness.

I’ve been introspecting for the last few weeks, ruminating on this ill-fitting identity . But I do sort of get it. It’s a close cousin of that other curious piece of urban mythology surrounding Bullseye lately: that we’re “elitist”.

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Dashing to present our glorious objects at the V & A. We must be just SO cool.
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Factory schmactory. I’m on my way to the Victoria and Albert Museum in London to set up Bullseye’s stand at COLLECT, the international art fair for contemporary objects.

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Fifteen hours, three airports and a cultural canyon away from Garlic Gulch.
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