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slumping molds

For discussion of processes related to using Bullseye glass, including kilnforming and kilncasting, torchwork, blowing and stained glass.

slumping molds

Postby Sadna » Mon Jan 25, 2010 11:54 am

Is it okay to use low fire clay for slumping molds for glass?
Sadna
 
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Re: slumping molds

Postby charlie » Mon Jan 25, 2010 1:06 pm

depends upon which low fire clay you use. get one that bisque's at least at 1600F.
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Re: slumping molds

Postby Sadna » Mon Jan 25, 2010 2:11 pm

Thank you, that helps a lot.
Bullseye, thank you for starting this forum. It is wonderful.
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Re: slumping molds

Postby Karen Lewit » Mon Jan 25, 2010 6:24 pm

I am also a studio potter and have made several molds from a mid-fire clay(cone4-6). I bisque fire the dry greenware mold to 06, kiln wash the mold and have had great success.
Karen Lewit
 

Re: slumping molds

Postby tommckay » Tue Jan 26, 2010 9:36 pm

I buy bisque from a pottery supply company to use as molds. They are much cheaper & I have no problems. In fact I find them smoother that 'proper' slumping molds with the exception of the Bullseye molds. Maybe one day I will buy some ceramic paint & use them foe their intended purpose!
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Re: slumping molds

Postby soobee » Thu Jan 28, 2010 2:31 am

Question on the ceramic slumping moulds from ceramic supplier.Don't you drill a release hole in the base before you slump? If not how do they release?
Wondering because you mentioned using them for their original purpose one day and mine all have a hole in the base.LOL
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Re: slumping molds

Postby Lynda B » Thu Feb 04, 2010 9:14 am

I have purchased commercial bisque for molds also. One caution, be sure to check and make sure the inside, what will become the bottom of your glass is flat, otherwise your glass won't sit flat. Often commercial bisque isn't intended to sit flat at that particular place.
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