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Fuse > Slump --- which side up?

For discussion of processes related to using Bullseye glass, including kilnforming and kilncasting, torchwork, blowing and stained glass.

Fuse > Slump --- which side up?

Postby baxsierex » Thu Apr 04, 2019 10:01 am

Hello-

I am a lampworker but a glass fusing newbie. I have subscribed to videos and digging through the forums. I really appreciate all of the resources!

I did my first test fire yesterday.

From this thread: viewtopic.php?f=14&t=4628
marykaynitchie@bullseyeglass.com wrote:For crisp lines, fire face down on the kiln shelf. Here is an article that has a couple of photos to show this:

http://www.bullseyeglass.com/images/sto ... eet_07.pdf
Mary Kay


I did the design down and capped with transparent for crisp lines.

I am mostly pleased with the results -- overall looks a little too hot. The edges aren't perfect, but not horrible. Next up: slump.

My questions:

1) For softly irregular edges and a few spikes --I don't have a grinder. I can sand a bit, though. Should I cut them to be square?

2) I was planning on placing the full fuse face-down (textured) side to be UP, but I want it to be glossy and the slump won't do that. Do I need to do another full fuse with the textured side face-up to smooth out the shelf texture before slumping?
Referencing this thread: http://www.bullseyeglass.com/forum/index/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=4720


Thank you.

FirstFusedPieces.jpg
FirstFusedPieces.jpg (171.37 KiB) Viewed 4095 times
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Re: Fuse > Slump --- which side up?

Postby marykaynitchie » Thu Apr 04, 2019 10:33 am

Welcome to the world of fusing and kilnforming! As a torchworker, you will be able to make some unique work using those skills to make elements to include in your fused pieces!

You are asking great questions. The uneven edges result from the cold glass arrangement having uneven depth, so certain areas flow out more than others. To prevent that, you could use dams. There is a good video on kiln furniture for more information regarding how to do that. https://videos.bullseyeglass.com/videos ... furniture/ (by subscription.)

Meanwhile, you could straighten out those sides using a lap wheel, or loose grits on a sheet of plate glass. We just made this coldworking video a free one: https://videos.bullseyeglass.com/videos ... oose-grit/

If you opt to cut the edges, you will lose a lot of area, because the scores would need to be wider than the thickness--perhaps more than a centimeter. So grinding would be preferable.

If you grind, do all the edges and when it's finished, rinse and scrub the edges thoroughly to avoid devitrification. It works best if you don't let the edges dry off before doing this thorough cleaning.

The you can do a fire polish firing. Clean the tile carefully and flip the tile with the shelf side up. At this point, I would recommend sifting an even, thin layer of clear powder over the whole tile.

Use a similar schedule, but consider dropping the process temperature by about 25 degrees F. That should be enough to gloss up the edges and the top that was previously against the shelf.

Then slump.

Let us know if you have questions, and good luck!

Mary Kay
Mary Kay Nitchie
Bullseye Glass Co.

Subscribe to Bullseye kiln-glass videos at
bit.ly/BullVideos
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Re: Fuse > Slump --- which side up?

Postby baxsierex » Thu Apr 04, 2019 11:01 am

Thank you for the detailed reply, Mary Kay. I just watched the coldworking video.

To make sure I understand correctly... after coldworking, refire the pieces at the full fuse schedule with the adjustment of dropping the process temp 25F? Leave all segment times the same as the schedule? I have clear powder that I will use as well.

I am still getting to know this new-to-me kiln. So along that same line... would that temp adjustment be sensible for my kiln going forward for the basic full-fuse firing schedule?

Thanks again.
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Re: Fuse > Slump --- which side up?

Postby marykaynitchie » Fri Apr 12, 2019 2:10 pm

If you were happy with the first firing, you can use that cycle for similarly thick projects. It takes a tad more heat (or time) to fuse the pieces of glass together, than to create gloss on a previously fired piece. That's why there is a drop of 25 degrees.

Mary Kay
Mary Kay Nitchie
Bullseye Glass Co.

Subscribe to Bullseye kiln-glass videos at
bit.ly/BullVideos
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