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Vitrigraph Kiln: Basic Use

For discussion and commentary regarding the Lesson and Project videos of the Bullseye Kiln-Glass Education Online program.

Vitrigraph Kiln: Basic Use

Postby Chris_Petrauskas » Fri Nov 11, 2011 5:14 pm

Watch the Lesson at:
https://videos.bullseyeglass.com/videos/vitrigraph-kiln-basic-use/

Please discuss and comment in this thread.

Thanks!
Chris Petrauskas
Bullseye Glass Co.
Portland, Oregon, USA
http://www.bullseyeglass.com
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Re: Vitrigraph Kiln: Basic Use

Postby ejgiebel » Sat Feb 04, 2012 10:49 am

One thing that would be quite useful for this video is some general idea on how long it will take to empty a pot with some number of ounces (or grams) of glass in it. I'm about to embark on this and I only filled the pot (the Bullseye vitrigraph pot) 1/2 full as I am interested in trying this, but didn't want to be pulling glass out of the pot for 2 hours my first go round. Obviously, it's a "your mileage will vary" measurement, but it gives first timers an idea on how much time they need to allow, or tells them to "fill the pot up, because just when you figure out what you're doing, it will be empty".
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Re: Vitrigraph Kiln: Basic Use

Postby marykaynitchie » Mon Feb 06, 2012 11:34 am

That's a good point. Did you try it? Did it take two hours for you to empty half a flower pot?
If we can get more information on what to expect, we can add that to a document under the "Learn More" tab.

Mary Kay
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Re: Vitrigraph Kiln: Basic Use

Postby ejgiebel » Mon Feb 06, 2012 4:57 pm

I did try it. Couple of things I experienced my first time:

1. Knowing when to take out the fiber blanket plug in the hole in the board. I thought I'd take it out around 1400-1450, so I could see it when it started to flow. Bad idea. The small glass bubble at the bottom of the pot cooled off, and it didn't get soft until I put the plug back in. But then I left it in too long (maybe 5 minutes), and when I pulled it out, I got a big glob of glass with it.

2. Having done this once, I'd recommend getting some Kevlar gloves to use, maybe even the arm protectors. Not the big, bulky mitts we all have, but just the ones that look like knit gloves. The regular mitts are too bulky, but just using tweezers or hemostats with no protection made me a little wary. The hot glass hitting my hand or arm would cause me to jump and stop pulling, and you couldn't grab a cooling, but still hot piece to help change the direction of the pull. The guy in the video has done this a lot that he can work with the mitts, but I found them too bulky to do much with any sort of control.

3. The coolest thing, which I had forgotten, is that as the pot gets down to the last bit, you will end up with glass straws. I had read this once, but forgot about it until it happened. I suppose if you pull really slow as you start to get straws, you can avoid this, but it didn't occur to me to try until I was done.

4. You can't (or maybe it just takes the right amount of practice with the right heat) just let it flow out into rod like strings, as the bit hanging out of the pot picks up weight, the whole thing starts to pick up speed. Only tried that once!

All in all, I was pulling for maybe 20 minutes with a 1/2 pot, and I had it a bit too hot. And I could have pulled or let it drip out longer, since there is a bit of glass still in the pot, but I was getting very fragile straws and couldn't figure out what I would do with them.

But this begets another question: How do you guys get the uniform (mostly, I notice different colors are different and the rods are not as uniform as the stringers) stringers and rods? Curious more than anything, but I understand if it's some sort of trade secret.
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Re: Vitrigraph Kiln: Basic Use

Postby marykaynitchie » Thu Feb 09, 2012 10:28 am

Hi Ed,

Thanks for sharing those details about your experience pulling vitrigraph stringers. Alas, I may not share any info about manufacturing rods on the Forum---except the pots we use are larger than a flowerpot.

I think you will find that pulling stringers and rods with the vitrigraph will get easier with practice.

Mary Kay
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Re: Vitrigraph Kiln: Basic Use

Postby ejgiebel » Tue Apr 24, 2012 10:48 am

OK, I had a group of glassies over this weekend for a "Fun with Vitrograph" event. One thing we noticed was that the pot of Eqyptian Blue we pulled was more brittle than any of the other colors I have experience with. We never could wrap it on a pipe, it would just break off at the hole as soon as you started to rotate the pipe. And when we were working swirls and the like, it just seemed to snap much easier than the others. Are certain colors more prone to this behavior, and short of trial and error, are there any guidelines to lessen the learning curve - not that trial and error isn't fun, but sometimes time doesn't allow!

So far I've done:
000100 - Black
000224 + 000113 - Deep Red and White
000203 + 000138 - Woodland Brown and Marzipan
000164 - Eqyptian Blue
001322 + 001409 - Garnet Red and Light Bronze

Thanks,

Ed
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Re: Vitrigraph Kiln: Basic Use

Postby Timmermanms » Thu Oct 18, 2012 1:45 am

marykaynitchie@bullseyeglass.com wrote:Hi Ed,

Thanks for sharing those details about your experience pulling vitrigraph stringers. Alas, I may not share any info about manufacturing rods on the Forum---except the pots we use are larger than a flowerpot.

I think you will find that pulling stringers and rods with the vitrigraph will get easier with practice.

Mary Kay



Aprox what temp can I expect if I only want to pull cane? Is it inthat temp scale even lower. I sure wish I knew where to buy that ridgerized board for the bottom .
Thanks!!
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Re: Vitrigraph Kiln: Basic Use

Postby marykaynitchie » Thu Oct 18, 2012 10:35 am

Hi Timmermanms,

I am guessing the temperature for pulling straight cane varies with the style. Different colors have different viscosities.

Re the rigidized base, do you mean this one?

http://shop.bullseyeglass.com/tools-sup ... board.html

Mary Kay
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Re: Vitrigraph Kiln: Basic Use

Postby jenha » Sun Nov 04, 2012 6:51 am

I'm new to working with stringer and so have some basic questions about annealing. If I have a project where I'm using stringer as-is (either pulled from vitrigraph kiln or premade Bullseye stringer) and not incorporated into a fired piece, do I need to worry about annealing? Would that depend on whether I manipulate the stringer--bend, coil, crimp with tongs, tack bits together with a torch--or on how thick the stringer is? Thanks!
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Re: Vitrigraph Kiln: Basic Use

Postby charlie » Mon Nov 05, 2012 6:54 am

jenha@frontiernet.net wrote:I'm new to working with stringer and so have some basic questions about annealing. If I have a project where I'm using stringer as-is (either pulled from vitrigraph kiln or premade Bullseye stringer) and not incorporated into a fired piece, do I need to worry about annealing? Would that depend on whether I manipulate the stringer--bend, coil, crimp with tongs, tack bits together with a torch--or on how thick the stringer is? Thanks!


for thin stringers, no. they're too thin and lose heat too quickly to worry about annealing by themselves. starting around 1/4" (or 1/8" if tacking them together in joints), then i'd start worrying about this.
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