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Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

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Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby Chris_Petrauskas » Fri Mar 16, 2012 12:00 pm

Watch the Project at:
https://videos.bullseyeglass.com/videos ... flow-slab/

Please discuss and comment in this thread.

Thanks!
Chris Petrauskas
Bullseye Glass Co.
Portland, Oregon, USA
http://www.bullseyeglass.com
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby jcgrenouilleau » Mon Mar 26, 2012 8:28 am

Good afternoon from sunny Munich, Germany !

Can you provide the reference of the mold used in the first example ? I could not find it in the online store...at least it did not look to me quite like the rectangular slumper...:(

In any case, thank you for a very inspiring video !

\Jessica
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby marykaynitchie » Mon Mar 26, 2012 10:37 am

Hi Jessica,

I checked with Jim Weiler, and he says the mold is 8925, the standard medium rectangular slumper.

http://shop.bullseyeglass.com/rectangul ... -mold.html

Thanks for asking!

Mary Kay
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Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby carmenreuter » Sat Mar 31, 2012 6:00 pm

Hi, have two questions regarding the plate made with some billets:

a) Why do you chose to use billets instead of a stack of clear glass? I am sure there is a very good reason, would like to understand it.

b) I can't picture the positioning of the billets in relation to the final result. The more I look, the more confused I get. Would you have a diagram, or a picture of the stacking before the first fusing? Failing that, a written explanation might shed some light for me.

Many thanks for a video on this totally fascinating subject, I hope there will be more to come.

Best wishes.
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby marykaynitchie » Tue Apr 03, 2012 1:09 pm

Hi Carmen,

Jim Weiler, who was our writer and demonstrator for this lesson, send me some answers and a drawing:

a) Billets are relatively free of bubbles as opposed to stacked fused sheet glass. This creates cleaner “windows” in the slab. Stacked sheet glass, however, will work just fine if you use it.

b) While the proportions may be off a little bit, the attached drawing shows the general layup of the billet piece in question and how the flow was generated. Remember that the slabs are subsequently butterflied and fused together to create the symmetrical repetition.

Mary Kay
Attachments
Jim drawing forum.jpg
Jim drawing forum.jpg (122.12 KiB) Viewed 47540 times
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby myvalley » Tue Apr 03, 2012 3:37 pm

Many thanks for the explanation, also for letting me know via email that you had posted a reply. You assumed correctly, the system hadn't notified me.

Regarding the billet chunks that sit on top of each stack of glass, are there several covering the whole length of each stack, or is it just one billet placed only towards the end of the stack?

Your reply will help me to know how many to order...looks like billets will be part of my future ;)

Best regards, Carmen
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby Bridget » Wed Apr 04, 2012 3:06 pm

I am going to try this. Is there a minimum slab size that you should not go under? For example, I want to make a slab which will ultimately be an inset into a 7" x 5" dish. My inset/inlay from the pattern bar flow slab will be approximately 5" x 3". Can I realistically make a 5" x 3" slab (that is 2cm thick) (I know I'm mixing my inches with my centimeters) without having issues with my dams (i.e. melting glass onto them due to gravity) or should I go a bit wider?

I hope I'm not confusing anyone.

thanks,

Bridget
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby marykaynitchie » Thu Apr 05, 2012 2:49 pm

Hi Carmen,

Jim still can't post, so here is his reply:

Those billet chunks were cut on a saw, in approximately 1.5” wide strips. They were then laid on top of the stack going the whole way down the length of the strips of stacked sheet glass.

Hope this helps.


It is not critical to do the project exactly the same as the one in the video--you might find the results of any variations you try quite rewarding!

Mary Kay
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby myvalley » Thu Apr 05, 2012 5:48 pm

It is not critical to do the project exactly the same as the one in the video--you might find the results of any variations you try quite rewarding!
Mary Kay


Thanks Jim and Mary Kay. I am very grateful for the information.

Because I mostly use 2mm glass, have to buy all billets and 3mm glass specifically to make this plate. This means importing it from overseas, or having it shipped from the mainland, depending on availability. Can't walk into the store next door, or even next city, to get it, so need to plan what I will order (including colors, type, quantity), and can't forget or miscalculate. This would mean another order, another 3 or 4 weeks, another cost of freight.

For the first test, having enough information to have a reasonable chance of success makes me move over that line where the cost (glass is considerably more expensive here) and time issues to get all the glass together keeps me wondering " should I ".

I am very comfortable making and selling jewelry, enjoy the process immensely, have a good market for it. With bigger pieces it is all unknown. Inevitably the " should I " question rises often.

Just wanted to explain the reasons why I have been asking for extra details (for example the idea of slicing the billets was an Aha moment for me). It is not about the particular design per se, but to increase my chances to end up with something worthwhile to look at. Something inspiring, that makes me want to continue in this direction, not demoralizing, that would make me feel "what a waste".

From there on, I am surely happy to experiment.

Now, with all the extra details you have kindly supplied, the reply to my " should I " is yes ;)

Thank you and best regards.
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby jennifer » Fri Apr 06, 2012 5:20 am

I've just taken a flow slab out of the kiln and found some pretty disappointing results. I wonder if anyone can tell me where I went wrong. I formed a 25cm x 25cm x 3 cm mould on a kiln shelf. According to the on-line lesson I should have used 4687 gm of glass. (25 x 25x 3 x 2.5) I cut rectangles that added up to 3795 gm and realized that even this was far too much and I wouldn't be able to fit it all into the mould. I looked at the on-line lesson video again and saw that they'd used 2 piles of 14 layers each so that's what I did. This amounted to about 2500 gm. Because I was using more glass than the on-line lesson, I increased the annealing time from 3 hours to 6 (although I kept the heating ramps, soak times and cool down ramps the same). This morning I took the slab out of the kiln only to find it has a crack down the middle of the underside and it's only 1.7 cm thick. Where did I go wrong? Can I fix this by re-firing? What schedule should I use this time?
Thanks for any help you can offer. Jennifer
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