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Powder Printing

For discussion and commentary regarding the Lesson and Project videos of the Bullseye Kiln-Glass Education Online program.

Re: Powder Printing

Postby paulmcgarrie » Wed Jun 17, 2015 11:28 am

hi there

thank you for the reply ,
i have watched the video a few times , but the powder printing i was referring to was with the
mesh , probably no difference though , maybe it's my kiln , as its a pottery one with a digital controller ,
i am going to give it another shot in the next day or so , as i just got some more rainbow irid clear to try with will let you know how it comes out .

thank you
paul
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Re: Powder Printing

Postby leannemmitt » Wed May 10, 2017 5:46 pm

In response to the post by Suds- Tues April 15 2014
'.....new 137 mesh screen, and for fun I tossed a spoonful of powder (0008) on the screen and tried to "squeegee" it through the mesh. Much to my dismay I could only get maybe 1/2 the powder to go through the screen even after dozens of passes with the cardboard squeegee.
Much of the powder is simply too large to go through a 137 mesh screen.'

I too had the same issue, and thank you Steve for clearing some of that up in your response.
My problem now is that the parts of my screen are full of 'wedged' powder which feels like sandpaper (can't really see it as I am using clear powder). I have tried brushing it with a stiff brush and using it like a stencil brush to try and push it through, but it wont budge and I am concerned I will damage the screen. Is there a particular way you would recommend removing it? A high pressure hose perhaps?

I am using a 55T white mesh with Systems 96 glass powder - made by Spectrum Glass and Uroborus (Yes I feel a bit traitorous, but that's what our local community arts center works with
: / )
Could there be a difference in the size of the powder between Systems 96 and Bullseye, therefore necessitating a coarser mesh maybe?

Look forward to your response

Thank you

Leanne
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Re: Powder Printing

Postby marykaynitchie » Thu May 11, 2017 3:33 pm

Hi Leanne,

Thank you for subscribing to Bullseye's videos, even if you don't use our glass. That provides some support for the full-time instructors and technicians who develop our educational articles and videos. We appreciate your support!

If you ever do decide to try Bullseye, here is some information to help you get started:
http://www.bullseyeglass.com/new-to-usi ... glass.html

While I don't have personal experience with other brands of glass powders, it would not surprise me if the grain sizes were slightly different. Within a grain size, there is a range of sizes that are all fall through the largest mesh filter, and are captured on a smaller mesh filter. Depending on the mesh sizes and materials used for the filters, one company's "powder" could be another company's "fine" or somewhere in between powder and fine.

Be careful not to use any force to push glass powder through a screen--that will wear out your screen. To wash it out, a water spray might work well, but wash it out in the opposite direction of the way it got in--you want to back the stuck grains out of your screen, not push them through.

I hope this helps.

Mary Kay
Mary Kay Nitchie
Bullseye Glass Co.

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bit.ly/BullVideos
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Re: Powder Printing

Postby leannemmitt » Wed May 24, 2017 5:35 am

Thank you for your response Mary Kay.

I will definitely re-dress my technique - a bit heavy handed I think. But the pressure hose cleaned the screen really effectively!

I contacted Spectrum Glass and Uroborus with a query about the size of their powder and if they recommended a certain screen mesh count for the powder printing technique.
Uroborus responded:

They said they screen their powder in a 60 mesh screen and that this size would ‘mostly’ pass through a 140 mesh screen (which is what I am using) but not all. They recommended using either a #80 or #100 mesh strainer form a ceramic supplier to separate out the coarser particles.

Can you tell me what # mesh screen Bullseye glass is passed through to create your powder?

This may give me an idea of how close it is in size to Uroborus powder, and therefor how close my 140 mesh screen is to being able to get the majority of the Uroborus glass powder through (or not).

I know it was suggested that the lower count mesh you go, the less detail it yields in the image, and therefore better to stay with a higher count and just sieve out larger bits, but if I am going to be losing a significant amount of powder before I start, maybe I would be better off trying a 137 (50T) mesh screen (and still sieving it first)?

Look forward to your response,

With thanks,

Leanne
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Re: Powder Printing

Postby marykaynitchie » Wed May 24, 2017 8:42 am

Hi Leanne,

Check here: https://www.bullseyeglass.com/how-big-a ... -need.html

Thanks,

Mary Kay
Mary Kay Nitchie
Bullseye Glass Co.

Subscribe to Bullseye kiln-glass videos at
bit.ly/BullVideos
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Re: Powder Printing

Postby leannemmitt » Thu May 25, 2017 3:32 pm

Thank you Mary Kay,

That gives me a better understanding of the difference between the two - I will continue to experiment!

Warmest regards,

Leanne
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Re: Powder Printing

Postby jagreqjones » Wed Jul 05, 2017 1:09 am

Chris_Petrauskas wrote:Yellow vs. white mesh:

The issue here is not about the mechanical properties of the mesh but how it handles exposure to ultraviolet light to set your image in emulsion.

A white mesh (clear filaments) can conduct full spectrum light so it will tend to pipe UV light beyond the edges of the open areas in your film when on the exposure table and thereby set a slightly larger area of emulsion than you intended.
Yellow mesh, by virtue of its color, filters out UV light so it should expose a more accurate stencil. There is not a huge difference but every cumulative thing you can do to enhance accuracy helps.

Thanks Chris for that detailed explanation of how the mesh color could impact accuracy. If you hadn't pointed this out I would never have known.
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