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Working Deep

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Working Deep

Postby Chris_Petrauskas » Wed Jul 10, 2013 12:48 pm

Watch the Lesson at:
https://videos.bullseyeglass.com/videos/working-deep/

Please discuss and comment in this thread.

Thanks!
Chris Petrauskas
Bullseye Glass Co.
Portland, Oregon, USA
http://www.bullseyeglass.com
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Re: Working Deep

Postby CharlotteK » Tue Jul 16, 2013 12:49 pm

Good video of "Working Deep".

In variations, is it possible to have a "tack fused" layer on the very top ie: one that retains texture?
If, so, what would a firing schedule be?

I've tried it using your work sheet with 22 layers.

I'd like to use texture on top— from 6 layers up to 20 layers.

Many thanks for providing these excellent videos.


Charlotte
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Re: Working Deep

Postby marykaynitchie » Tue Jul 16, 2013 5:37 pm

Charlotte,

What kind of texture? One thing I can imagine (though I've never seen it done) is firing a deep piece face down into fiber paper with cutouts ("kilncarving"). Would that work for you? Here is a video if you need to get a better idea of what I mean: https://videos.bullseyeglass.com/videos/kilncarving/

Thanks for supporting our video series with your subscription! You and all the other subscribers help us add lessons to the series.

Mary Kay
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Re: Working Deep

Postby CharlotteK » Wed Jul 17, 2013 10:05 am

Hi Mary Kay,

I recently took a wonderful course at Bullseye Bay Area with Jeremy Scidmore called "Painting with Glass". We worked mostly with 4mm clear and used powders and frit fired to various temp to achieve different results in our test pieces.

I liked how the low firings to 1350-1375 that retained the gritty texture from the brushes and other tools.

Working at my studio, I used 3mm clear glass for 3 of my base layers sifted with frit, powders etc, each fired individual to full fuse. (I have a small Skutt Firebox 14) For the top layer I used BE soft ripple glass with powders fired to the low temp of 1350 to retain the texture of the glass and powders.

So, WORKING DEEP, if I want to fire all 4 (or more) layers together (with a dam) how best to go about retaining the texture in the top layer? Do I first fire the bottom three (or more) layers together full fuse? Then add the top layer and fire to tack fuse temp? I can't figure out a fusing schedule to achieve this result. (I don't thinkthe kiln carving method will work for the details).

I could upload pictures if that would help! :)

Thanks, Charlotte
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Re: Working Deep

Postby marykaynitchie » Wed Jul 17, 2013 10:45 am

Hi Charlotte,

I think you are on the right track about making your "blank" first, and fully fuse that to the depth that you choose. Then apply the frits and powders or other glass "accessories" on the surface and give it a final tack-firing. In this final firing, dam the edges (again), even though you are firing at a lower process temperature. This is a preventative measure, in case your tack-fusing process temperature actually causes the glass to soften enough to spread outside of the footprint.

Mary Kay
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Re: Working Deep

Postby CharlotteK » Wed Jul 17, 2013 12:46 pm

Hi Mary Kay,

Would the firing schedule for this final top layer "tack fuse" be a typical schedule for two layers of glass? or would I need to do a final firing tack fuse schedule for 6 layers? or up 22 layers? Am considering issues with thermal shock, annealing, if using working deep schedules again.

This is what is confusing about this "final" firing as I haven't seen it addressed in any of my usual message boards like Bullseye, Warm Glass and Paul Tarlow's fusing schedules.
ie: Retaining texture and dimension on the top layer of a thick/deep piece.

I appreciate your help!

Charlotte
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Re: Working Deep

Postby marykaynitchie » Wed Jul 17, 2013 4:22 pm

Hi Charlotte,

Six layers of 3mm glass that have been previously fused together would be less than 2 cm of glass (in thickness). So, I looked for one of our published fusing cycles that involved heating up a piece of that thickness to less than a full fuse temperature. I found one under the "Learn More" tab over the "Harnessing Glass Flow" project. The slumping cycle there suggests heating the slab quite slowly compared to the first full firing. After holding for 20 minutes at 1000° F to allow the heat to be distributed as evenly as possible, you can go up to the process temperature (anywhere from 1180-1250°F, depending on your kiln). Hold for 10 minutes there. Then anneal according to our annealing schedule for thick slabs. If your frits on the top level are of various thicknesses, you will want to anneal more slowly than we recommend for a slab of even thickness.

For the details, you can find the firing cycle here: https://videos.bullseyeglass.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Harnessing_Flow_in_Kiln-Glass_-_Learn_More_L048.pdf

Watch the "Harnessing Glass Flow" video for an explanation of why the glass needs to be heated so much more slowly than it did on the first, full firing.

Does that help? If you are uncertain, you could make a smaller model of the project in the same thickness, maybe 3-4 inches in diameter, and take that through both cycles (first the full firing, and then the tack firing) so you can personally observe the results before you work on your intended project.

Mary Kay

PS: If anyone has other suggestions, chime in. I haven't actually done a project quite like Charlotte's, so others may have good advice based on personal experience.
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Re: Working Deep

Postby CharlotteK » Sat Jul 20, 2013 6:26 am

Thanks, Mary Kay,

I will take your suggestions from "Harnessing Glass Flow" and do some small squares about 4" x 4" x 12mm with varied temps for the final tack fuse top layer and will report my findings!

Charlotte
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Re: Working Deep

Postby Bridget » Sun Aug 11, 2013 12:51 pm

Just wanted to say that I love this technique. I have completed two projects using it and am going to do a third "do over". Why the do over, because my daughter helped me with the first Koi and it came out so cool, that I want to do a second one for an art exhibit that I will be showing at. The one my daughter and I made is a "keeper". Attached are pictures of the final projects.

If you cannot see the attachments, they may be seen at these pages on my blog: http://bstiverson.wordpress.com/2013/08/09/something-special-going-on-in-the-glass-studio/ for a picture of process I used to creat a Koi fish deep slab. And also this picture of my "xylophone" http://bstiverson.wordpress.com/2013/08/07/you-are-cordially-invited-2/

The xylophone came out beautifully. I did however, have a few more bubbles than I wanted on the Koi, I think for the next project, I will hold a little longer on the bubble squeeze. I did have an uneven layer - the sheet of glass with the koi fish on it - it was first fired as a single sheet of glass with frit for the koi.

Again, love this technique and love the video lessons!

Bridget
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Re: Working Deep

Postby marykaynitchie » Mon Aug 12, 2013 9:03 am

Hi Bridget,

Thanks for sharing your Working Deep works--great that you and your daughter can work together on these pieces! The xylophone is especially nice, and nicely made.

Mary Kay
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