bullseyeglass.com • View topic - Working with Frit Balls

Working with Frit Balls

For discussion and commentary regarding the Lesson and Project videos of the Bullseye Kiln-Glass Education Online program.

Re: Working with Frit Balls

Postby steve » Fri Mar 28, 2014 6:37 pm

I have recently done some work with frit balls:

http://www.searobinglass.com/Making%20the%20Glass3.html

Because my frit balls ended up buried in Tekta glass, devitrification was not an issue. I am basically an experimentalist, so I have wandered some from what is often done. I think the video is excellent, especially in pointing out the fact that different glasses behave differently when making frit balls, or as I termed them "beads". I basically tried the color I liked and found out if it would do what I wanted to do. When I have scrap Bullseye from a project sitting around, I like to cut it into bits and see what kind of frit balls it makes.

-Steve Morse

steve@searobinglass.com
www.searobinglass.com
steve
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Apr 22, 2013 9:40 am

Re: Working with Frit Balls

Postby marykaynitchie » Mon Mar 31, 2014 8:48 am

Steve,

Wow, thanks for the link! In my book you are the champion of frit ball fabrication and usage.

Everyone check out this link! http://www.searobinglass.com/Making%20the%20Glass3.html

Mary Kay
Mary Kay Nitchie
Bullseye Glass Co.

Subscribe to Bullseye kiln-glass videos at
bit.ly/BullVideos
marykaynitchie
 
Posts: 1205
Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2011 5:39 am

Re: Working with Frit Balls

Postby suds » Tue Apr 01, 2014 9:50 am

steve@searobinglass.com wrote:I have recently done some work with frit balls:

http://www.searobinglass.com/Making%20the%20Glass3.html


Wow.
The gate to the Adventure Garden is awesome!
What a beautiful piece of work.
Steve
suds
 
Posts: 87
Joined: Sun Jul 28, 2013 3:48 pm

Re: Working with Frit Balls

Postby loismayparker » Sun Apr 06, 2014 4:20 am

Great video, thanks. I'm a novice, and just made frit balls, then fused them together whilst keeping their round shape, then slumped them in a wave. This process has made the diferent behaviours of glass at different points really visible - surface tension versus gravity, changing the outside and not the inside, changing the inside and not the outside...I'd recommend it for anyone beginning in fused glass. I also now fill those little gaps on a full fuse firing with little bits of glass and get lovely nuggets for use on other projects. A great way to use up scraps and add to the repetoire at the same time.
Lois
loismayparker
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Feb 02, 2014 11:42 pm

Re: Working with Frit Balls

Postby ssheffield » Thu Jul 03, 2014 5:55 pm

I just made my first batch of frit balls using extra coarse clear frit. I love how big they are. I've noticed that there is a lot of kiln wash still on some of the balls. In the video it was suggested to soak them in CRL, but doesn't give a recommended amount of time for the soak or if the CRL needs to be diluted. Anyone have some recommendations?
ssheffield
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Jan 21, 2014 9:30 am

Re: Working with Frit Balls

Postby Twin Vision Glass » Mon Jul 14, 2014 8:41 am

Steve, the gates are playful and fabulous. Leslie
Leslie Rowe-Israelson
Give out FREE hugs!
Twin Vision Glass
 
Posts: 567
Joined: Wed Feb 04, 2009 4:42 pm
Location: Invermere , B.C. Canada

Re: Working with Frit Balls

Postby marykaynitchie » Tue Jul 15, 2014 4:10 pm

Hi ssheffield,

Here is Bonnie's advice:

I’d start with a 20 minute soak in undiluted CLR. Abrading and rinsing after the soak is what will release the primer.

I’m surprised that clear picked up so much primer. If following all of our recommendations (BE primer, new application of primer on a scraped shelf, kiln dried, frit ball firing sched, etc.), I’d check in at process temp for to see if the process soak could be shortened or adjust the firing schedule to minimize heatwork. The ideal, which should be attainable with Clear, is to have that great frit ball shape w/ a clean release.


When I tried this I dumped all my frit balls into a jar of CLR so I could shake it up every so often. However, I gave up before abrading all the frit balls!

We hope this helps.

Mary Kay
Mary Kay Nitchie
Bullseye Glass Co.

Subscribe to Bullseye kiln-glass videos at
bit.ly/BullVideos
marykaynitchie
 
Posts: 1205
Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2011 5:39 am

Re: Working with Frit Balls

Postby sue_offler » Fri Jan 02, 2015 2:45 pm

Hi folks

I've had my kiln a while but have only ever used it to anneal beads and do a bit of fusing for jewellery, both of which I have been given full schedules for. I really want to make the frit balls dish in the tutorial (with the opalino frit) - I have successfully made balls in 4 different colours using the instructions (including the opalino) but even after paying to watch the video and reading all the posts I can find on the forum I don't understand how to work out the kiln schedule for the fusing and slumping parts. I thought I might be able to use one of the standard schedules on the site but I've seen others saying they have melted their balls by using these - does anyone have an introduction to how to work this out? Is it a long slow ramp up and then quick down, slow down or something in the middle? Frit balls would not act the same way as sheet glass I'm guessing, so wouldn't need such high temperatures or soak times? Any advice welcome! :)
sue_offler
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2015 1:54 pm

Re: Working with Frit Balls

Postby marykaynitchie » Fri Jan 02, 2015 5:27 pm

Hi Sue,

Thanks for asking about this! I looked at the links under the "Learn More" tab for the video lesson and was surprised to see that we don't list the Frit Balls QuickTip article there. So, here is the link: http://www.bullseyeglass.com/images/sto ... _Balls.pdf.

...To make the opaline frit-ball bowl shown above, first create a dam by cutting a 5.5" circle in a sheet of 1/8" fiber paper,leaving the border intact. Place the dam on a primed kiln shelf and load it up with about five ounces of frit balls. This approach essentially creates a new material that is a few frit balls thick with a network of tiny connection points. Nestle them into place and fill in any large gaps or thin spots. Tack them together by firing at a rate of 300°F (167°C) per hour
to 1375°F (746°C) for 10 minutes. Slump the piece in a separate firing using mold 8746. We recommend annealing in both firings...


I hope this helps. Let us know if you do the project!

Mary Kay
Mary Kay Nitchie
Bullseye Glass Co.

Subscribe to Bullseye kiln-glass videos at
bit.ly/BullVideos
marykaynitchie
 
Posts: 1205
Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2011 5:39 am

Re: Working with Frit Balls

Postby sue_offler » Sun Jan 04, 2015 1:03 pm

Hi Mary Kay

Thanks for the reply. :) I had seen that tip sheet but am still confused - "Tack them together by firing at a rate of 300°F (167°C) per hour to 1375°F (746°C) for 10 minutes." - is that from cold? What temperature should I hold it at for annealing (which is mentioned as necessary) and for how long? How fast do I drop to the annealing temperature? I saw one schedule in this thread: viewtopic.php?f=14&t=522 which hadn't worked and another thread where an anneal temperature of 900F (which is the temperature recommended in the standard fusing schedule online) had melted the balls into a plate, which is why I'm so confused! Am I making any sense?!?! :)
sue_offler
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jan 02, 2015 1:54 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Online Education

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron