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Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

For discussion and commentary regarding the Lesson and Project videos of the Bullseye Kiln-Glass Education Online program.

Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby jennifer » Tue Apr 10, 2012 3:23 pm

[quote="marykaynitchie@bullseyeglass.com"]Hi Jennifer,
Jim's reply:
.................On a side note, and as a fun challenge, every time you change the level and placement of the stacks make a little sketch to “guess” what the internal pattern will be. I think after a few slabs you will be able to figure out how to design a block fairly precisely to your design needs.

Oh my! That's quite a challenge! I'll try it and see how far I get with it. I think it may require another big order for glass! ;) Also some rods as I just watched the lesson on Kilnforming with Rods.

Thanks for the answer on increasing (or not) the process soak time.
Jennifer
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby jennifer » Wed Apr 25, 2012 5:32 pm

I found that the bottom of my flow slab has picked up a lot of kiln wash (Hotline Primo Primer) and I'm having a difficult time removing it all. Part 3 of the flow slab video shows a slab being cleaned by rubbing it on some kind of abrasive surface but it's hard to see just what that abrasive material is. Is the actual surface of the sanding area abrasive or is there some kind of loose abrasive grit paste being used? Can someone clarify this?

Jennifer
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby charlie » Thu Apr 26, 2012 8:43 am

jennifer@buckner.cc wrote:I found that the bottom of my flow slab has picked up a lot of kiln wash (Hotline Primo Primer) and I'm having a difficult time removing it all. Part 3 of the flow slab video shows a slab being cleaned by rubbing it on some kind of abrasive surface but it's hard to see just what that abrasive material is. Is the actual surface of the sanding area abrasive or is there some kind of loose abrasive grit paste being used? Can someone clarify this?

Jennifer


anything abrasive will work. you could try drywall sanding screen or wet/dry sandpaper (with a bit of water to keep the dust down). a sandblaster is best, if you have access to one. you can also use loose blasting grit on a flat surface (float glass, granite slab sink cutout, etc) with a little bit of water to make a very dry slurry, but that's not optimum.
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby marykaynitchie » Thu Apr 26, 2012 9:51 am

In Part 3 of the Pattern Bar: Flow Slab lesson, Jim is using loose grit slurry, mixed with water, on a float glass surface. This is a fairly inexpensive way to dress the edges. Let me know if you need to know the mesh size and I will get in touch with him. We could also add this info to the "Learn More" document associated with this lesson.

Mary Kay
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby jennifer » Thu Apr 26, 2012 2:07 pm

Charlie and Mary Kay,

Thanks for the information on removing kiln wash from the flow slab. I do have a sandblaster but haven't used it in many years. I guess I'll have to get it up and running again. In the meantime, I'll just use the loose grit on a pice of float. Mary Kay, adding this information to the "Learn More" section would be great.

Jennifer
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby marykaynitchie » Mon Apr 30, 2012 9:51 am

The components of the loose grit slurry are water and 80 grit silicon carbide.

Mary Kay
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Flow pattern bar - congratulation plus question

Postby mycrafts » Tue Jul 17, 2012 10:33 pm

Wow, what an interesting video! They get better all the time. The results from the flow bars, so different on each side, are fascinating.

The idea of showing the pre-fire layout next to the finished plate is excellent. Have been studying the layout for the green/orange plate and the resulting pattern, it is slowly starting to make sense.

I wonder if you would have pictures (even a diagram/sketch would help a lot) with details for the black/white plate, the very first at the beginning of the film? Pattern bar stacking sequence, lay out for the flow would be great.

Would love to take a class of course, but travelling from Australia is not in the cards right now.

Many thanks, mycrafts
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby marykaynitchie » Thu Jul 19, 2012 5:31 pm

Hi all,

I received some great images of pattern bar pieces done by Margot U. after she watched this lesson. We want to share them with all of you. Also, I just checked out her website and she did a nice blog post about the process:

http://www.glassartbymargot.com/Blog/fu ... -did-take/
http://www.glassartbymargot.com/Blog/fu ... lab-plate/

Enjoy!

Mary Kay
Attachments
Margotpatternbar2.jpeg
Margotpatternbar2.jpeg (19.7 KiB) Viewed 27397 times
Margotpatternbar.jpeg
Margotpatternbar.jpeg (7.32 KiB) Viewed 27397 times
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby HRoss » Sat Sep 22, 2012 2:06 am

I have made my pattern bar flow slab and have cut it into 10mm slices arranged and fired it to 815°C hold 20 mins in mullite dams. On inspecting the piece this morning there are some small fissures on the top surface where the glass hasn't quite met the neighbouring piece but there is still glass on the bottom. Is there an easy way to sort this out like firing to a hotter temperature if so what would be a recommended temperature? Holding fr longer? Flipping the piece over and refiring?

Many thanks in advance

Helena
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Re: Pattern Bar: Flow Slab

Postby Twin Vision Glass » Sat Sep 22, 2012 9:45 am

Hi! I know we have discussed this but will try to find out where in the discussion it may be. I am thinking you might not have ground the bottom and gotten rid of all the foreign matter which in turn does not allow the glass to flow in a normal manner. I strongly suggest where ever the glass has touched the kiln wash or fiber , that it needs to be ground off and cleaned very well after ward. (this means the sides of the bars tooo. ) I find grinding each join on an angle so the glass is actually underneath each join is a lovely clean approach as well. Make sure the bottom joint from the underside of the glass is as pleasing as the top end before firing . (Once the sawed bar has been stripped of the particles that are not glass, it should behave nicely for you .) I am also wondering if your temp is a bit high. Perhaps try the lower longer approach and at the end of the day you will be so happy. (hopefully)
Leslie
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