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Gum Image Transfer

For discussion and commentary regarding the Lesson and Project videos of the Bullseye Kiln-Glass Education Online program.

Re: Gum Image Transfer

Postby zadygirl » Wed Jun 27, 2012 2:00 pm

Thanks Mary Kay!
I have purchased all items just waiting for the resource company recommended in the video to deliver. They were much cheaper than my local art store. I'm looking forward to testing my skills and will be checking into taking the class!

Always load of fun with BE!!
Jeri
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Re: Gum Image Transfer

Postby zadygirl » Sat Jun 30, 2012 6:29 pm

Hello,
I'm wondering if anyone else has attempted to follow the video and create an image? I'd like to share my experience and concerns!

1. First, it was a hoot trying to do this today! I did purchase all of the exact materials used in the video and setup exactly like the video.

2. The video is obviously edited a bit or I'm a total klutz because the video has very little ink on anything especially Carrie's hands! Mine were totally black! :lol: I will assume too much ink although I swear I followed the video on my iPad as I went and every thing I did looked identical up until the brayer touched my hands! That being said, if it's just me then fine but if this process truly gets messy then it would be beneficial to show it in the video so those of us who are attempting can not feel so hmmm what's the word? Inadequate! I'm a pretty seasoned fuser, artist but omg this was the funniest mess ever. Thank goodness my son came into the studio when he did or I may have been stuck for hours not being able to touch anything!

3. I felt as though the mixture of the Gum Arabic was very tacky but nothing was said about adding more water if needed or yes the mixture would be tacky. Is it this tacky, should it be, if not can you add more water or should you?

4. I mixed up the ink/setswell and it looked just fine and smooth as suggested. I rolled my brayer through it coated it nicely, did a test on the news print, looked good but then I re-rolled it and maybe this is where I went wrong? Maybe where I got too much ink?

5. Layer of the Gum Arabic; plate down; more Gum Arabic then rolled it and there was so much ink I couldn't see the print so I was pretty darn sure I had too much! Went to wiping with the water sponge and that's when I became covered in ink. But I could see the process was working and adhering to the print and I finally wiped off the excess ink but all my water was then very dirty and no way to prepare more with out getting ink all over the studio but kept going.

6. I think one other possible mistake is that we use all-in-one paper for the inkjet and laser printer and I'm thinking maybe a true laser paper would be better because it seems as though the paper was getting tiny little paper/fiber balls on it as I continued to wipe. I did finally get all of them off as I wiped. Do you think the laser paper would be better?

7. The pieces of glass that I pre fired were not the size of a full sheet of paper. I was going to make 5x7 prints and 4x4 prints so I now know to cut the paper down to the size of the glass because if it's too big you can't see to line it up properly! See how much confidence I had! I made seven pre-fired pieces to do at one time! In hind sight I thing I was a little over the top!

8. My white areas of the print were not as clean as Carrie's demo so when I did the transfer it wasn't what I would consider clean therefore when laying the glass powder down it was splotchy and with black powder going down on white glass I knew it would be a mess. Is it something I did wrong that caused there to be too much mixture still on the paper therefore making for a more messy "canvas" on the glass? What would I do to change this?

9. I powdered it all up several times and even though in the end I just washed it all away, my black lines really did look good and fairly crisp but I didn't want to waste the glass and fire it knowing I would have a clean looking background. Am I being to OCD to expect this final look?

10. The final firing schedule(s) that could be used would be helpful. I know everyone hates to hear that question asked and normally I just wouldn't but I'm doing it anyway! I was thinking something similar to the pre-fire but a little higher to melt in on in more?

11. Yes, I will try again tomorrow, Yes I want very much to take the class, Mostly I really did have a good laugh messing with it and I'm keen to start again tomorrow hoping for a better ending!!

I hope this will help me and others that are going to try it out. I also hope for a few answers to my questions to help me and others along the journey!

Thanks so much,
Jeri Dearing
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Re: Gum Image Transfer

Postby maryjparker » Thu Jul 05, 2012 8:38 am

Thank you for beginning these video sessions. As a visual learner it is great to actually see the process!!

I have a couple of questions:
1. The video says that it is recommended that the glass be preheated to 1400. Would I follow the same firing schedule that is recommended for firing the glass powder with the ramped cooling or can it be a bit quicker?

2. After firing the glass powder on, can the image be reversed and viewed from the back or is the glass on that side distorted from sitting on the kiln shelf. I don't know it that makes sense.

Anyway, thanks again for this learning option.
Mary Jane
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Re: Gum Image Transfer

Postby marykaynitchie » Thu Jul 05, 2012 9:35 am

Hi Mary Jane,

1) I would cool down the glass the same way for each of those two firings.

2) If your base glass is transparent, I expect that your image would have similar quality viewed through the base. However, the base glass will pick up the texture from the shelf, so the view will be obscured by that texture. Does that make sense?

Mary Kay
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Re: Gum Image Transfer

Postby marykaynitchie » Thu Jul 05, 2012 9:37 am

Hi Jeri,

So many questions! It will take us awhile to collect some answers. Glad you are enjoying the process. How did your pieces come out? Do you have any photos to post?

Mary Kay
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Re: Gum Image Transfer

Postby marykaynitchie » Thu Jul 05, 2012 2:02 pm

Hi Jeri,

I checked with Bullseye instructor/technician Louise Krampien, and she was able to provide a lot of advice based on her experience both learning this method, and watching students learn this method in Carrie Iverson’s classes.

The video is obviously edited a bit or I'm a total klutz because the video has very little ink on anything especially Carrie's hands! Mine were totally black!... Thank goodness my son came into the studio when he did or I may have been stuck for hours not being able to touch anything!


LK: Carrie has been doing this process for a number of years, and is quite an expert printer. It is very typical of students new to this process to end up with ink allover their hands, arms, and sometimes even faces! Oil-based ink spreads easily, but in time with experience the messiness will decrease.

The most common causes for inky hands in class is that
1) Students rotate their water-only (wiping) sponge to use the cleaner (less inky) sides against the paper surface, and
2) Students forget to utilize the 3rd bowl for wringing out dirty water from the water-only sponge.

The rotation of the inky water only sponge puts hands in contact with the ink, and typically gets worse as the inking, wiping, and wringing sequence is repeated. Once ink gets on your hands, it then will get on the next item you touch (brayer, plate, glass, face etc.) and the ink then seems to spread exponentially! I recommend designating a "hand side" and a "ink/plate side" to the water only sponge. You will notice in the video that Carrie is careful to always grab the water-only sponge on it's clean back side, wrings out the dirty water in the third bowl (this helps keep your water in the middle bowl clean), then she uses it to wipe the plate, and returns the sponge back to the middle bowl, always keeping the inky side down, and the clean side up for her hand.


…the mixture of the Gum Arabic was very tacky but nothing was said about adding more water if needed or yes the mixture would be tacky. Is it this tacky, should it be, if not can you add more water or should you?


LK: So long as you are using the recommended water to gum proportions, your mixture is correct. The mixture will be tacky.

I mixed up the ink/setswell and it looked just fine and smooth as suggested. I rolled my brayer through it coated it nicely, did a test on the news print, looked good but then I re-rolled it and maybe this is where I went wrong? Maybe where I got too much ink?


LK: The amount of ink on the roller should be fairly light. It is likely that you had too much ink drawn out on the swatch where the roller is inked. There will be a "hissing" sound that happens as you ink your brayer. If the sound is very loud and crackly, there is too much ink drawn out in the swatch. Use the putty knife to remove the ink swatch, and reset your swatch by drawing out a little bit at a time. Build the swatch up slowly and evenly. It’s possible for this to take a few minutes. You should be looking for an even thin "velvety" texture to the ink, and a "hissing" sound as you roll the brayer across the surface. With too much ink on the roller is transferred to the plate, it is very difficult to wipe the plate clean. The goal is to build up multiple very thin layers of ink onto the plate.

Layer of the Gum Arabic; plate down; more Gum Arabic then rolled it and there was so much ink I couldn't see the print so I was pretty darn sure I had too much! Went to wiping with the water sponge and that's when I became covered in ink. But I could see the process was working and adhering to the print and I finally wiped off the excess ink but all my water was then very dirty and no way to prepare more with out getting ink all over the studio but kept going.


LK: Again, this is likely due to having the brayer loaded with too much ink. Thin layers are key. The reason that you became covered with ink at this time is that there was excess ink to remove, and rotating the water only wiping sponge causes this excess ink to travel to your hands. Remember to designate a clean (hand) side and a dirty (plate) side to this wiping sponge, and to wring it out in the third bowl. This will keep the water in the middle bowl clean. If you do find your workspace or yourself getting excessively inky, it is best to pause, tidy up your workspace, and start fresh.

I think one other possible mistake is that we use all-in-one paper for the inkjet and laser printer and I'm thinking maybe a true laser paper would be better because it seems as though the paper was getting tiny little paper/fiber balls on it as I continued to wipe. I did finally get all of them off as I wiped. Do you think the laser paper would be better?


LK: We use standard copy paper for all classes, as per Carrie’s recommendation. The reason the paper may start to break down when printed is twofold:
1) There is too much water being applied to the plate via the water-only sponge. Wring this sponge out a bit more before wiping.
2) There is too much pressure being applied by the printer with the sponge. Students new to the process have a tendency to use the sponge as a cleaning device, and sometimes default to "scrubbing" the plate to remove the excess ink. This causes the paper to become overly saturated, and little balls of the fiber start to break down.

The wiping should be done with a sponge that is not too saturated with water, and the wiping is a skimming motion. Apply enough pressure to skim away the ink, but not enough to scrub the surface of the paper too aggressively. This is a fine line, and this technique does take practice to refine. If you notice the paper breaking down, stop, discard the plate, clean the inking station and brayer, removing any paper fiber balls that may be present. Start with a new plate. Be careful to not allow the paper bits to contaminate your brayer or ink swatch, as this will affect the consistency the ink on your brayer, and therefore can affect subsequent plates that you may be inking as well.

The pieces of glass that I pre fired were not the size of a full sheet of paper. I was going to make 5x7 prints and 4x4 prints so I now know to cut the paper down to the size of the glass because if it's too big you can't see to line it up properly! See how much confidence I had! I made seven pre-fired pieces to do at one time! In hind sight I thing I was a little over the top!


LK: It's good to start with one piece at a time, and some students do find it helpful to trim their paper down to the size of their glass. However, I like to have a margin of paper that I can handle when lifting the print to the glass, so that I do not touch the inked image area on the plate. You may consider doing your transfer of the plate to the glass over a light table, so that you can see where the image is through the paper.

My white areas of the print were not as clean as Carrie's demo so when I did the transfer it wasn't what I would consider clean therefore when laying the glass powder down it was splotchy and with black powder going down on white glass I knew it would be a mess. Is it something I did wrong that caused there to be too much mixture still on the paper therefore making for a more messy "canvas" on the glass? What would I do to change this?


LK: I think these issues are attributed to loading too much ink on the brayer. You may also try increasing the amount of Setswell in your ink, as the Setswell is what helps make the inky "fluffy" and easier to wipe away. It is fairly normal to have some degree of background "noise" to these images, and you can always clean up your glass with paper towels or cotton swabs after transferring the print to the glass.

I powdered it all up several times and even though in the end I just washed it all away, my black lines really did look good and fairly crisp but I didn't want to waste the glass and fire it knowing I would have a clean looking background. Am I being to OCD to expect this final look?


LK: The more experience you have printing the cleaner the negative space in your plates will be. It does take time to perfect this process. Until then, If you want a crisp clean background, try cleaning up residual ink or powder with cotton swabs and/or paper towels.

The final firing schedule(s) that could be used would be helpful. I know everyone hates to hear that question asked and normally I just wouldn't but I'm doing it anyway! I was thinking something similar to the pre-fire but a little higher to melt in on in more?


An example of a firing schedule for a 3mm tack fuse project:
300°F dph to 1000°F. Hold for 0:10.
600°F dph to 1400°F *. Hold for 0:10.
9999 dph to 900°F. Hold for 1:00.
100°F dph to 700°F. Hold for 0:01.
9999 dph to 70°F. Hold for 0:01.

*This is a desired tack fuse temperature, which would range from 1275-1400 depending on the desired effects.

An example of a firing schedule for a 6mm full fuse project:
250°F dph to 1225°F. Hold for 1:00.
600°F dph to 1490°F. Hold for 0:10.
9999 dph to 900°F. Hold for 1:00.
100°F dph to 700°F. Hold for 0:01.
9999 dph to 70°F. Hold for 0:01.

I hope that helps!

Mary Kay
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Re: Gum Image Transfer

Postby karyncott » Tue Jul 17, 2012 1:43 pm

Today is my trial and error day with the image transfer. First statement: I cannot seem to get off enough of the ink surrounding the image and my what a mess it made of my hands and sponge. I tried it twice and both times not enough ink from the image transferred to the glass and the surrounding left over ink transferred as well to the glass. Carrie makes it look so simple. As far as I can see from the instructions, I am doing it properly (I have watched the video 3 times and did not pick up anything that I missed.) :? Can anyone shed any light on perhaps what I could be doing better. The more I gently rubbed to get the ink off, the thinner the paper got and it finally got a hole in it. Helpppppppppppppppppppppppp
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Re: Gum Image Transfer

Postby marykaynitchie » Tue Jul 24, 2012 9:19 am

Hi Karyn,

It seems like this is a challenging technique! Did you give this post a read? I think that some of the advice from Louise might be helpful to you.

http://www.bullseyeglass.com/index.php? ... 6131#p6116

Mary Kay
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Re: Gum Image Transfer

Postby zadygirl » Wed Aug 01, 2012 9:56 am

Just bringing an update to my successful experience with the Gum Image Transfer! First I'd like to say thank you Mary Kay to the detailed reply you gave to my lengthy original post. The answers really helped this to be a really good experience.

The video does make it seem much simpler than it is in reality but it's not as hard knowing the other answers. I am amazed at the detail that I retained after the firing. Also amazed that the black powder turned out to be much softer looking than I anticipated. I was just sure I'd end up with black blobs!

I did do all 6 pieces in one sitting. It took about 4 hours total but I think only because I was being super careful not to end up with ink all over me this time and I did quite a bit of clean up on each piece mostly because of worrying over too much black powder. The 2 white pieces are 5x7 and the 4 French Vanilla Shell tiles are 4x4. I used the same black ink in the video with stiff black powder instead of regular black.

There was a fair amount of residue/powder on the open areas surrounding the images so I used 4 different style paint brushes ranging from very soft to very stiff to clean up that area as well as removing areas within the image to try to retain the detail. A lot of work but worth it in the end. Once I removed the areas within the images I re-powdered again then tapped it back off which left the slightest coloring so it didn't look like I'd removed any. Only on the horses mouth do I feel like I removed a little too much. You can see from the before and after pictures the difference.

My biggest surprise I think was that I had absolutely no devit on any of the pieces! I didn't fire them directly on the kiln shelf because my experience with this tends to not be so good so I used thin fire and happily every piece came out perfectly clean and glossy!

I will continue this in one more post so I can add up close pictures of the shells ....
Attachments
ink_horse_before.jpg
Horse before firing and extra touch up
ink_horse_before.jpg (187.81 KiB) Viewed 46216 times
before_ink_multiple.jpg
Before firing
before_ink_multiple.jpg (148.74 KiB) Viewed 46216 times
ink_multiple.jpg
Completed
ink_multiple.jpg (142.17 KiB) Viewed 46216 times
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Re: Gum Image Transfer

Postby zadygirl » Wed Aug 01, 2012 10:17 am

Successful gum Image continued ;)

This time I did not use my bare hands for any of the actual inking process! I didn't like the feel of the gum arabic on my hands because it's so sticky so I used a playtex glove on my hand for the sponge and once I'd laid that on the glass and the print I took that glove off and used another one to do the ink/water application. (yes, a little OCD plus didn't want black hands again!) I also went as far as wrapping a paper towel around the handle of the brayer!

I still found it a bit hard to get a clean look on the print before transferring to the glass but this got a little better by the 6th piece. Once I rubbed the image onto the glass as instructed I took a paper towel and cleaned as much of the residue around the imagine as possible. This was on pieces 2-6 after learning on the first piece which was the horse. I found this really helped on the final clean up on the others. Next I did all the powdering and then the cleaning up of what I felt was access powder.

You can really tell from the before and after pictures how different it looks but I also think this is because the black ink combined with the black powder looks like too much when really its not.

I used the firing schedule recommended in Mary Kay's answers to my earlier questions and cut the hold time at top temp by 3 minutes only because I was happy at that point with the way they looked. I fired this batch in my Paragon GL24ADTSD on a Corelite shelf.

Well that's enough info for now as you are all probably about asleep but I just wanted to try and help a little! I'm glad I stuck with it and will love exploring further ideas! I would like to know and I think it's been said but just to clarify, can I use any color ink? It just seems like white might be better in the scheme of things as far as mess!

Thanks Bullseye for all that you do to inspire us along!
Jeri
Attachments
ink_mulitpleshells.jpg
Up close of multiple shells
ink_mulitpleshells.jpg (195.86 KiB) Viewed 46215 times
ink_sandollar.jpg
Up close of the Sandollar
ink_sandollar.jpg (184.42 KiB) Viewed 46215 times
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