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Working Deep

For discussion and commentary regarding the Lesson and Project videos of the Bullseye Kiln-Glass Education Online program.

Re: Working Deep

Postby Bridget » Mon Aug 12, 2013 12:44 pm

I do have a question regarding the bubble squeeze hold, if I do another Koi project, I think I should either hold the bubble squeeze longer to eliminate the bubbles that I had in this last project. Can a bubble squeeze hold period ever be too long?

Thanks,

Bridget
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Re: Working Deep

Postby marykaynitchie » Mon Aug 12, 2013 2:23 pm

Bridget,

Can you give us your full cycle?

Also, not to confuse everyone, but TipSheet 3: Working Deep includes firing cycles to consider. I am not sure why I did not link to it before in this thread. (Note: if you click on the image, you can scroll to get to the content at the end)

http://www.bullseyeglass.com/methods-id ... -deep.html

Mary Kay
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Re: Working Deep

Postby Bridget » Mon Aug 12, 2013 3:20 pm

[quote="marykaynitchie@bullseyeglass.com"]Bridget,

Can you give us your full cycle?

MaryKaye,

I used the schedule posted in the Learn More section of the Working Deep video lesson as follows:

firing schedule for this Project
Rate Temperature Hold
1 250°F (139°C) 1225°F (663°C) 3:00
2 600°F (333°C) 1500°F (816°C) :20
3 AFAP 900°F (482°C) 4:00
4 27°F (15°C) 800°F (427°C) :00
5 49°F (27°C) 700°F (371°C) :00
6 162°F (90°C) 70°F (21°C) :00

I did not change anything. I had also used this schedule for the "Xylophone" piece as well.

Thanks,
Bridget
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Re: Working Deep

Postby marykaynitchie » Tue Aug 13, 2013 8:47 am

Hi Bridget,

It looks like that cycle worked fine for your xylophone piece, which was fitted more precisely (trapping less air in the first place) and had a design that provided escape routes for bubbles.

For the next koi piece, what do you (and any readers) think of dropping the bubble squeeze hold down 25 degrees to 1200°F, for three hours? I am guessing that there are more central gaps in the koi design, and that a lower bubble squeeze temp would allow the weight of the glass to push the gap air out the sides when the glass starts to soften, before the edges seal up.

Mary Kay
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Re: Working Deep

Postby Bridget » Tue Aug 13, 2013 9:54 am

Mary Kay,

I will try that on my next Koi. I am also going to fuse the Koi to at least two layers of glass before I put into the stack. The first one, I did a single sheet. I think between having a more even layers and the lower temperature for the bubble squeeze may help. I did take the time to re-read the Working Deep tip sheet and between it and this conversation, I think my issues will be resolved. I will post and let you know how the next Koi comes out when I get it done.

Thanks for all of the support!

Bridget
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Re: Working Deep

Postby driscoll.rae » Mon Dec 01, 2014 7:14 am

I have two questions before I give this a try. I want to work deep but will be using nuggets and small amounts of frit and pre fired elements. What kind of setup should I have on the edge of my dam to get a bullnose? I will not have the options described in the lessons. I will try to pile my glass away from the edge but am unsure what height of fibre paper to use, previous attempts gave me a rough edge. I suspect I will have more bubbles so what should I change in the firing?

The second question concerns finishing the edges in the round piece if I need cold working. What is the best method to keep a round footprint? I will be using a stainless steel ring.

Thanks

Rosemary
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Re: Working Deep

Postby wlewtoda » Tue Jun 09, 2015 9:18 pm

I'm creating a series of layered blocks about the size of a fat bar of soap - can I fire them all at once by building a framework of dams? Or can I just put fiber paper or thinfire paper between them (or would they push the paper around)? Also, in reading the tip sheet about deep fusing, the instructions say to use clear irid around the sides and on the bottom to get a better release from the fiber paper. I don't want an irid surface, so I would use clear only, or nothing around the sides. If I *didn't* border the sides of the block, would the sides fuse sufficiently to be smooth (vs. still showing the layers)? I am assuming I would still need to cold work the sides and bottom regardless. I'd like to get a depth of about 1-3/4". Is that even achievable?
Thanks for your help!
-Wendy
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Re: Working Deep

Postby marykaynitchie » Wed Jun 10, 2015 1:21 pm

I'm creating a series of layered blocks about the size of a fat bar of soap - can I fire them all at once by building a framework of dams? Or can I just put fiber paper or thinfire paper between them (or would they push the paper around)?


Use dams. Your dams might need extra weight on the tops to keep the glass from seeping under or pushing the dams outward. View the subscription video about Kiln Furniture: https://videos.bullseyeglass.com/videos ... furniture/

Also, in reading the tip sheet about deep fusing, the instructions say to use clear irid around the sides and on the bottom to get a better release from the fiber paper. I don't want an irid surface, so I would use clear only, or nothing around the sides. If I *didn't* border the sides of the block, would the sides fuse sufficiently to be smooth (vs. still showing the layers)?


You can use uncoated clear glass. If any paper fibers do stick, you would need to coldwork them off. The edges will have the paper texture whether or not the glass is iridized. The danger of using no edge glass is that as the layers collapse when the air escapes, bits of fiber could possibly be caught between the edges of each layer. We hope that doesn't happen! l The perpendicular glass "liner" strips reduce the opportunities for fiber trapping.

Without it, the layers will be more apparent, which you might desire. See Jeffrey Sarmiento's work. http://www.bullseyeprojects.com/Artist- ... 61&ppage=6 If you click on any of the works, there are sometimes additional detail shots that reveal these layered edges.

I am assuming I would still need to cold work the sides and bottom regardless. I'd like to get a depth of about 1-3/4". Is that even achievable?
Thanks for your help!
-Wendy


Yes. I hope you have had a chance to view the video related to this discussion thread. Working Deep: https://videos.bullseyeglass.com/videos/working-deep/

Thanks for posting, and please let us know what you make!

Mary Kay
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Re: Working Deep

Postby redhotglass1 » Wed Sep 12, 2018 12:25 am

I thought I'd give this technique a try but I'm a bit uncertain about pre-firing the individual layers. Do you mean that each 3mm layer is pre-fired individually or that each layer is pre-fired with a clear 3mm on top?

Many thanks

Sandra
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