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What is firepolishing?

Firepolishing is the process of heating a glass object in a kiln to a temperature high enough to impart some level of gloss to the surface. Related Questions What temperature should I use for firepolishingHow can I cast to get some read more

Can I make my own stringers?

Yes you can hand-pull your own stringers using a Vitrigraph kiln. If you have the opportunity to use a Vitrigraph kiln we highly recommend you take it. Not only is it fun but you will be able to make unusually shaped stringers that can read more

What's the difference between kilncasting and lost wax kilncasting?

Lost wax kilncasting is just one of many kilncasting methods. To learn more about this method see TipSheet 8 Basic Lost Wax Kilncasting  or our Video lesson Lost Wax Kilncasting. FAQs Return to Index of FAQs  read more

What types of kilncasting can I do?

Kilncasting projects generally fall into one of two broad categories those which are made in open-faced molds and those that are made in closed or semi-closed molds. In open-faced molds one side of the mold is left completely open. read more

What molds are used for kilncasting?

Molds for kilncasting fall into two broad categories open-faced or closed/semi-closed. In open-faced molds one side of the mold is completely open; the cold glass is placed directly into the mold through that opening. Using open-faced read more

What kiln should I use for casting?

Almost any kiln that will fit your mold setup will work.  The most important thing to consider when selecting a kiln for casting work is whether there will be plenty of room around the mold to allow for uniform heating and cooling. In read more

What is investment?

Investment is a mixture of materials used to make a mold. In general investment mixes for kilncasting glass are composed of three basic ingredients a binder a refractory and modifiers. Some artists use readymade investment mixes like read more

What form of glass do I use for kilncasting?

Different casting methods and desired outcomes will necessitate different forms of glass.  For example if working in the pate de verre method you will want to use frits and powders.  Whereas when working in the box casting method read more

What firing schedule do I use for casting?

As with nearly all kilnforming projects the answer will vary depending on a number of factors such as the mold you're using the process you're using as well as the glass you're using. For example a pâte de verre firing schedule would read more

What equipment do I need for kilncasting?

At the very least you'll need a kiln kiln furniture and a suitable work surface. The rest depends entirely on the scale and type of casting you plan to do.  Two of the most popular kilncasting processes are box casting and lost wax read more

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Bullseye Glass Color Conversion Chart

Bullseye Glass styles conveniently converted to CMYK and RGB color values to streamline your work flow and help you visualize your designs before you make a single cut. Download the Bullseye Glass Color Conversion Chart here…

Murakami SP-9500 Diazo Sensitizer Mixing Instructions

Overview Murakami's premier dual cure graphic emulsion. Outstanding resolution of fine details. An easy to use emulsion with wide latitude and exceptional durability. For instructions' download our Diazo Mixing Instructions…

Pre-Firing Your New Kiln

Overview Before using a new kiln for glass projects' you will need to pre-fire it. This burns out binders' moisture' and other residue left over from the manufacturing process. Read and download the PDF file' Pre-Firing…

Mold Tips: Heart Casting Mold (8976)

More Information Mold Tips' Heart Casting Mold (8976) PDF Helpful Resources Clean Shield Gel product useFrit tinting articleFrit tinting videoMold Tips' Suggested Slumping SchedulesTips for Using Bullseye Slumping…

Working with Accucast 880 Blue

Overview Accucast 880 Blue is a type of alginate that is fairly easy to mix and sets in 5-10 minutes. It has a somewhat short working life and will dry out and shrink over a couple of days. However' if kept in a sealed…

Quick Tip: Kilncast and Slumped Bowl

Get experience in volume calculation' frit tinting' and more as you create a kilncast disc from a frit-and-powder mixture' coldwork the edges' and slump it into this graceful bowl. Prepare the Dam Cut a 1" strip of 1/16" Fiber…

Recommended Annealing Cycle for Bullseye Glass

Save time and energy. Anneal thick slabs at 900 degrees. As of June 2009' Bullseye has changed its chart for annealing thick slabs. Specifically' the recommended anneal soak temperature has been lowered from 960°F/516°C to…

Mold Tips: Pyramid Casting

Overview The Pyramid Casting Mold is an easy and fun project for beginner kilncasters.  You’ll learn a variety of concepts integral to kilncasting' including mold preparation' glass loading (feel free to use either…

Annealing Thick Slabs

Fahrenheit VIEW/PRINT Celsius VIEW/PRINT Overview When a piece of hot kiln-glass is returned to room temperature' it cannot be allowed to cool too quickly. If cooled too quickly' the temperature differential throughout…

TipSheet 3: Working Deep

Overview This TipSheet will introduce you to ways to float imagery and color within thick blocks of clear glass. Thick glass castings have resulted historically from pours of furnace glass or by kiln-melting glass…

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What is kilncasting?

Kilncasting is the process of creating a glass object in a kiln by heating glass above or inside a refractory mold until it flows to fill the void. One of the biggest challenges in kilncasting is creating the mold.  There are two…

What is firepolishing?

Firepolishing is the process of heating a glass object in a kiln to a temperature high enough to impart some level of gloss to the surface. Related Questions What temperature should I use for firepolishing'How can I cast to get…

Besides sandblasting, how can I remove devit?

If your glass is flat, you can sift a very thin layer of Clear powder (about 2 grains thick) over the entire piece and fire it to 1425°F (774°C) - 1450°F (788°C) for about ten minutes, depending on your kiln.  This should…

Can I make my project at Bullseye studios?

Yes, once you've taken at least one kilnforming class at Bullseye, you're welcome to assemble and fire projects during our Open Studio sessions. Bullseye Studios are located inside Bullseye Resource Centers. Our studios are fully…

Can I make my own stringers?

Yes, you can hand-pull your own stringers using a Vitrigraph kiln. If you have the opportunity to use a Vitrigraph kiln, we highly recommend you take it. Not only is it fun, but you will be able to make unusually shaped stringers…

How do I learn to kilncast glass?

Many people are most successful when they start by taking a class. To find a short course that's convenient for you, check our classes  or search for a teaching studio near you. Depending on the type of kilncasting you want…

What types of kilncasting can I do?

Kilncasting projects generally fall into one of two broad categories: those which are made in open-faced molds, and those that are made in closed or semi-closed molds. In open-faced molds, one side of the mold is left completely…

What form of glass do I use for kilncasting?

Different casting methods and desired outcomes will necessitate different forms of glass.  For example, if working in the pate de verre method you will want to use frits and powders.  Whereas when working in the box casting…

Do glass colors change in kilncasting?

Color can change depending on a variety of factors.  (For example, the thickness of the glass and the amount of time spent at casting temperatures).  Some Bullseye glasses, mainly the 001100 series and 001400 series, are so…

How large can my casting be?

Your casting can be as large as your kiln will allow. As a rule of thumb, the interior of the kiln should be at least twice the height of the final casting or more, depending on your setup. For large castings, one of the most…