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What is firepolishing?

Firepolishing is the process of heating a glass object in a kiln to a temperature high enough to impart some level of gloss to the surface. Related Questions What temperature should I use for firepolishingHow can I cast to get some read more

Can I make my own stringers?

Yes you can hand-pull your own stringers using a Vitrigraph kiln. If you have the opportunity to use a Vitrigraph kiln we highly recommend you take it. Not only is it fun but you will be able to make unusually shaped stringers that can read more

What's the difference between kilncasting and lost wax kilncasting?

Lost wax kilncasting is just one of many kilncasting methods. To learn more about this method see TipSheet 8 Basic Lost Wax Kilncasting  or our Video lesson Lost Wax Kilncasting. FAQs Return to Index of FAQs  read more

What types of kilncasting can I do?

Kilncasting projects generally fall into one of two broad categories those which are made in open-faced molds and those that are made in closed or semi-closed molds. In open-faced molds one side of the mold is left completely open. read more

What molds are used for kilncasting?

Molds for kilncasting fall into two broad categories open-faced or closed/semi-closed. In open-faced molds one side of the mold is completely open; the cold glass is placed directly into the mold through that opening. Using open-faced read more

What kiln should I use for casting?

Almost any kiln that will fit your mold setup will work.  The most important thing to consider when selecting a kiln for casting work is whether there will be plenty of room around the mold to allow for uniform heating and cooling. In read more

What is investment?

Investment is a mixture of materials used to make a mold. In general investment mixes for kilncasting glass are composed of three basic ingredients a binder a refractory and modifiers. Some artists use readymade investment mixes like read more

What form of glass do I use for kilncasting?

Different casting methods and desired outcomes will necessitate different forms of glass.  For example if working in the pate de verre method you will want to use frits and powders.  Whereas when working in the box casting method read more

What firing schedule do I use for casting?

As with nearly all kilnforming projects the answer will vary depending on a number of factors such as the mold you're using the process you're using as well as the glass you're using. For example a pâte de verre firing schedule would read more

What equipment do I need for kilncasting?

At the very least you'll need a kiln kiln furniture and a suitable work surface. The rest depends entirely on the scale and type of casting you plan to do.  Two of the most popular kilncasting processes are box casting and lost wax read more

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Quick Tip: Fritfetti

Say yes to sprinkles! Steps (4 firings) Make frit balls with Medium Frit. See Quick Tip' Frit Balls. Cut 7” (approx. 18cm) circles. You’ll need 3 circles of Clear and one of each opalescent style to make the…

Pre-Firing Your New Kiln

Overview Before using a new kiln for glass projects' you will need to pre-fire it. This burns out binders' moisture' and other residue left over from the manufacturing process. Read and download the PDF file' Pre-Firing…

Quick Tip: Little Wisp Bowls

Create your own streaky color palette. Layer Clear and White Streaky sheet glass over transparent tint glass styles. Slump in the Cone Bowl mold to upturn the edges and achieve luscious color at the rim. We’re making bowls…

Quick Tip: Opaline Overlays

Style codes for glasses above' White (000113-0030)' Driftwood Gray (000132-0030)' Elephant Gray (000206-0030)' Deco Gray (000136-0030)' Slate Gray (000236-0030)' Black (000100-0030)   Opaline sheet glass. Amazing…

Using Fusible Decal Paper to Transfer Laser Printed Images

Overview With this paper you can make a decal out of any image that you can print on a laser printer' including letters' numbers' line art' graphics' or even photographs. A black and white photograph that has good contrast as…

What size French Cleat do I need?

Overview Once you know the total weight of your piece' use this chart to select the right cleat(s). For more tips' download our What size French Cleat do I need' PDF.  More Information What size French Cleat do I…

Quick Tip: Raise the Bar on Your Soap Dish

Add an accent color—and functionality—to your new soap dish with a little help from Bullseye fusible rods! We paired Robin’s Egg Blue Opalescent with Driftwood Gray rod' but you could use any combination.   Step…

Using Color Line Screen Paste

Overview Color line screen paste offers the ability to add high-pigmentation design elements and imagery onto sheet glass with no powdered enamels to mix. Pastes come ready to print' and are available in a wide range of…

Mold Tips: Heart Casting Mold (8976)

More Information Mold Tips' Heart Casting Mold (8976) PDF Helpful Resources Clean Shield Gel product useFrit tinting articleFrit tinting videoMold Tips' Suggested Slumping SchedulesTips for Using Bullseye Slumping…

Quick Tip: Working with Petrified Wood

Petrified Wood is Bullseye’s magical unicorn streaky. Its unique combination of glasses results in dramatic internal reactions at full-fuse temperatures. Here are two ideas for making this glass sing.   Copper…

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Kilncarved Billet

Creating a low-relief glass sculpture often requires a complex plaster-silica mold-making process. Kilncarving is a simple casting process that uses ceramic fiber paper and the right amount of heat to achieve similar results.In our Kil…

Pâte de Verre Bowl

Pâte de verre is a casting method that involves hand-packing layers of glass in a refractory mold. In French, the term literally means “paste of glass.” You can use this method to make a variety of forms. These include vessels, sc…

Making Multiple Wax Models

If you plan to kilncast multiple copies of an object, you may need to make multiple wax models of that object.In this lesson, you'll learn how to create a wax model. We'll start with this plastic mold used in our lesson, “Day of …

Lost Wax Kilncasting

Lost wax kilncasting is a versatile method for making glass pieces in almost any form imaginable. The process involves creating a refractory mold around a wax model. The wax is then removed—or "lost"—creating a cavity. Glass is cas…

Day of the Dead Skulls

Pâte de Verre is a casting method that involves hand-packing layers of frit and powder in a refractory mold. The term literally means “paste of glass” in French. Works made with this technique take many forms. These include thin-w…

Open-Faced Kilncasting

For the artist who wants to make sculptural glass, open-faced kilncasting offers a relatively simple and direct technique. It also serves as an introduction to principles used in more complex kilncasting methods. The process involve…

Box Casting

Box casting is a great way to create a reverse-relief, cast-glass object with exceptional clarity. The results are typically clean and predictable, making the process ideal for producing multiple editions of a piece. In this lesson,…

Working Deep

Working Deep is a method of floating or embedding imagery or color within a thick block of glass. The method involves stacking and fusing multiple layers, using the transparency of the material to create a three-dimensional design. Whe…

Kilnformed Container

This lesson provides basic instructions for making a thick-walled kilnformed glass container. You will explore the materials, tools and techniques involved, and learn how to fire sheet glass that’s arranged around an investment core,…

What is kilncasting?

Kilncasting is the process of creating a glass object in a kiln by heating glass above or inside a refractory mold until it flows to fill the void. One of the biggest challenges in kilncasting is creating the mold.  There are two…

What is firepolishing?

Firepolishing is the process of heating a glass object in a kiln to a temperature high enough to impart some level of gloss to the surface. Related Questions What temperature should I use for firepolishing'How can I cast to get…

Besides sandblasting, how can I remove devit?

If your glass is flat, you can sift a very thin layer of Clear powder (about 2 grains thick) over the entire piece and fire it to 1425°F (774°C) - 1450°F (788°C) for about ten minutes, depending on your kiln.  This should…

Can I make my project at Bullseye studios?

Yes, once you've taken at least one kilnforming class at Bullseye, you're welcome to assemble and fire projects during our Open Studio sessions. Bullseye Studios are located inside Bullseye Resource Centers. Our studios are fully…

Can I make my own stringers?

Yes, you can hand-pull your own stringers using a Vitrigraph kiln. If you have the opportunity to use a Vitrigraph kiln, we highly recommend you take it. Not only is it fun, but you will be able to make unusually shaped stringers…

How do I learn to kilncast glass?

Many people are most successful when they start by taking a class. To find a short course that's convenient for you, check our classes  or search for a teaching studio near you. Depending on the type of kilncasting you want…

What types of kilncasting can I do?

Kilncasting projects generally fall into one of two broad categories: those which are made in open-faced molds, and those that are made in closed or semi-closed molds. In open-faced molds, one side of the mold is left completely…

What form of glass do I use for kilncasting?

Different casting methods and desired outcomes will necessitate different forms of glass.  For example, if working in the pate de verre method you will want to use frits and powders.  Whereas when working in the box casting…

Do glass colors change in kilncasting?

Color can change depending on a variety of factors.  (For example, the thickness of the glass and the amount of time spent at casting temperatures).  Some Bullseye glasses, mainly the 001100 series and 001400 series, are so…

How large can my casting be?

Your casting can be as large as your kiln will allow. As a rule of thumb, the interior of the kiln should be at least twice the height of the final casting or more, depending on your setup. For large castings, one of the most…