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As the only gallery at Art Miami showing exclusively art made of glass, we’ve been the seed for some provocative conversations.

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Possibly the most remarkable thing about the Bullseye Glass factory is that it exists at all.

It is the 21st century. Stuff is made in China, Indonesia and Vietnam.  That any product can be made by hand on an industrial scale in America today defies the economic odds. That many of those same hands – in their off hours – also make art, is the second miracle of Bullseye.

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Last night I went to the awards reception for the factory’s eighth annual show of glassworks made by its people.

The Working Glass exhibition is always fun. This year the minds, eyes and hearts that schedule, ladle, roll, build, sell and teach with Bullseye glass delivered up some of the most engaging pieces I’ve seen in years.

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Glass wants to be big.

Think about it. Ours is a medium that by its very nature overflows its edges. Its containers refuse to contain themselves. The light reflected and refracted by a glass object can spill over into surrounding space. Not unlike architecture, glass can define space.

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Jessica Loughlin in Bullseye’s factory studio, caught between Ted and Tom, between horror and enthusiasm, between art and design, between a rock and a hard place…..

This defining ability of the material is probably why I am so drawn to glass objects that are about space – and why glass seems to me to so naturally speak the language of architecture.

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………..Don’t walk on the art!

Even if it’s designed to be walked on, climbing up the prototype Michael Rogers staircase would not be a good idea. We’ve suggested as much by making the treads much narrower than standard and starting their rise a couple of feet off the ground.

Plus, the stairs don’t go anywhere. (But lots of people say that about contemporary art).

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Sorry to have stalled after posting about Dan Klein’s death. It just took the wind out of my sails.

Meanwhile, it’s been pointed out to me that it’s a bit morbid to have an obit on the blog for over a month. And, more to the point, Dan would have thought so too. It’s true – he would have.

Dan cared passionately about our field and worked relentlessly to advance it in the larger art world – whether that world was called craft, decorative arts, applied arts or contemporary art.

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Close to Close. ART Santa Fe was a chance to show our artists’ work in a different context. read more