Folks come from far and wide to take classes in Bullseye’s Research & Education studios in Portland, and this week was no exception.

A group of 10 students from Japan have been here participating in a five-day glass fusing expedition organized by Junji Miwa of Jujo, a Bullseye dealer in Nagoya, Japan. This is the sixth such group trip that Miwa has led to Portland since 2005. For several members of the group, this was a return trip. Here are a few pictures snapped throughout the week. read more

In the newest Bullseye Kiln-Glass Education Online video lesson, we showed you a fun and easy project that uses the pâte de verre method.  Day of the Dead Skulls is a great way to learn the basic principles of the method, and have a finished product to show for it.  Now let’s take a look at some more advanced applications of pâte de verre.

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Day of the Dead (Dios de los Muertos) conjures some very distinct imagery: skeletons and skulls, often with big toothy grins, adorned with bright marigolds and intense saturations of color.  Macabre but also festive.  Most of you know it, or have seen it without realizing.

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Bullseye glass celebrates its 40th anniversary at the Portland factory

Welcome to the Bullseye Boardwalk!

Bullseye had its 40th Anniversary Boardwalk Bash party at the factory in Portland, OR in August. read more

Artist Lynn Basa in Bullseye's R&E studio

Artist Lynn Basa (center) visits Bullseye's Research & Education studio to check in on the project.

Bullseye is proud to be part of TriMet’s new Portland-Milwaukie light rail line, scheduled start service in September 2015. Our Research and Education team collaborated with the Canadian firm Mosaika to translate Chicago-based artist Lynn Basa‘s paintings into glass mosaics for the shelter columns at the new MAX line stations. read more

When I first saw online images of the glass that had been selected for the Emerge 2014 show, I was puzzled. I couldn’t understand what distinguished these pieces from many of the other images of glass I had looked at online, or why they would be chosen to represent the forefront of emerging contemporary kiln-glass. Then I attended the Emerge 2014 opening at Bullseye Gallery, and realized what I had been missing—and why.

Getting up close and personal with "Barbican" by Harry Morgan

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PCDH19 Alliance joins us for a Glass For Good party

PCDH19 Alliance's mission is to make life easier for those affected by PCDH19, a rare form of female epilepsy

Glass For Good is an opportunity to make art and support a charitable cause.

Here’s how it works: read more

I recently posted some images on Facebook of a factory tour that I led at Bullseye for a group of second and third graders. Then I casually commented that children’s tours helped me to understand “what it is about glass that most attracts kids.”

Kids and Glass: a magic – and sometimes maniacal - match.

I should know better. A friend immediately jumped in and asked me to list “the top 3 or 4 things” that make this material so attractive to kids. read more

Congratulations to the Emerge 2014 award winners! The awards were announced on April 12th during an award ceremony at Bullseye Gallery in Portland.

More exciting news from the ceremony: Emerge/Evolve—an exhibit featuring selected works from Emerge 2014 and work by three past Emerge finalists—will travel to the Bellevue Arts Museum in Bellevue, Washington, in spring 2015. read more

You know that old chestnut about necessity being the mother of invention? Nowhere is it more true than in a kiln-glass studio. At least in mine. I’ve repeatedly found myself having to research subjects about which I was completely ignorant, learning a new skill (such as brazing stainless steel for a sculpture base), or experimenting with an unusual new material.

Mica in the raw. I collected this from an old quarry.

Case in point: I’ve been working with glass frit powder in a variation of the pate de verre technique, making three-dimensional glass bird feathers. Many real feathers have iridescent surfaces and glint with metallic tints when the light catches them at certain angles. I wanted to figure out a way to emulate this effect, but Bullseye Glass doesn’t manufacture iridescent frit. What to do?

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